Building contractors remember late obstetrician/ gynaecologist

An organisation representing general building contractors in Ireland has given a €15,000 donation to charity in memory of a highly regarded local consultant obstetrician/gynaecologist who passed away last year.

The Master Builders and Contractors Association (MBCA ) gave the money to the Motor Neurone Disease Association in memory of the late Rory O’Connor. He worked at University Hospital Galway from 2000 until he died in December 2009 from the condition.

He was the chairperson of the Institute of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and was national speciality director. He made a major contribution to obstetrics and gynaecology at both clinical and national strategic levels. He is survived by his wife Siobhan and two children, Anna and David.

This donation was the surplus raised at the MBCA annual dinner last year and is donated to the president’s nominated charity.

Funds received by the charity provide specialised equipment and assistance towards home help for sufferers.

Motor Neurone Disease (MND ) is the name given to a group of related diseases affecting the motor neurones in the brain and spinal cord. These nerve cells control muscles and their degeneration results in their becoming weak and wasting. Such wasting generally occurs in arms and legs initially, some groups of muscles being affected more than others. MND is incurable leaving people unable to do everyday things, such as walking, talking and swallowing which may become virtually impossible

The Irish Motor Neurone Disease Association (IMNDA ) provides care for people with the condition, their carers and families, as well as supporting research into the causes and treatments of the disease.

The IMNDA has set up groups regionally throughout the country to help raise awareness - the Galway group was set up in Loughrea in November 2009. People interested in getting involved with this group should call freefone 1800 403 403 or email [email protected]

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