Osteoporosis specialist to speak in Galway

Irish Osteoporosis Society national health promotion officer Michele O’Brien will be one of the speakers at a health and wellbeing event to take place in Claregalway next Thursday May 7. The event, organised by the National Dairy Council in partnership with Arrabawn Co-op will be held at The Claregalway Hotel from 7.30pm with proceeds from the evening going to heart charity Croí.

The event will also feature leading independent nutritionist Paula Mee, who will discuss new research on the nutrient richness of dairy produce; a presentation on skincare from the inside out from Biotherm area manager Silvanna Landa; and delicious samples of dairy products from Arrabawn Co-op.

Osteoporosis is the world’s leading bone disease and affects people of all age groups, including children. In Ireland it affects one in two women and one in five men over 50. It is known as the ‘silent disease’ as the majority of people have no pain until they fracture, however it is estimated that only 15 per cent of those affected are diagnosed.

Osteoporosis is a disease which is preventable and treatable in the majority of people. At the event O’Brien will discuss osteoporosis, low bone mineral density, and the risk factors. She will look at the importance of nutrition, weight bearing exercises, and fall prevention in leading a bone healthy lifestyle.

“Calcium plays a key role in bone health, and unfortunately, insufficient intakes are quite prevalent in Ireland,” said Conor Ryan, CEO of Arrabawn. “As more than 90 per cent of the body’s total calcium content is present in the bones and teeth, Arrabawn Dairies offer you food that is high in calcium which is essential to healthy bone development.”

A booklet about osteoporosis is also available free of charge. For information about where to download the guide, visit www.3aday.ie or www.ndc.ie, or for a printed copy call the Osteoporosis Society at 1890 252 751 or the National Dairy Council on (01 ) 6169726

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