Galway City Council launches Greener Green Waste Initiative

Starting July 31, Galway City Council will not collect green waste from areas around the city

Starting tomorrow, Friday July 31, the Galway City Council will not collect green waste from neighbourhoods around the city, and it is asking the public not to collect grass cuttings from public green areas.

City Hall's Parks Department is concerned about the cutting back of shrubbery during the bird nesting season, and cutting of grass very short, thereby eliminating many species which attract bees such as orchids. As a result, residents are requested to comply with the following measures, which City Hall has launched as part of its Greener Green Waste Initiative.

Flower Grass Lawn Mowed

Residents’ Associations will be given two weeks’ notice of the next date that mulching can be carried out on branches, etc. It is anticipated this will happen in late autumn, and the council requests no cutting back be carried out before this.

'Garden waste such as leaves, grass, hedge cuttings, and old plants are a valuable resource within gardens and strengthens the soil's capacity to adapt to climate change'

The council will provide a grass cutting service which mulches the grass. Mulching is the process of placing garden waste in thin layers on the soil to break down naturally. It is ideal for shrub borders, under hedges and in woodland areas. Mulching reduces weeds, moderates soil temperatures, retains moisture, and prevents soil compaction. This grass is not collected as part of the process and residents are requested not to collect this grass and bag it as it then becomes a waste.

Residents are asked not to prune back landscaping on public lands as this often causes damage and disease to the plants. If residents feel strongly about tidying up greenery, the council will arrange for two days per estate, at pre-agreed dates, when a mulcher will be brought on-site and the greenery will be mulched and taken away or used on-site. This can then be recycled and is not classified as a waste product. Only greenery from public lands will be accepted. Residents should use their brown bin for green waste associated with their own property.

The council may assist residents in setting up composting facilities on-site at a suitable location and give information on managing such a facility. Garden waste such as leaves, grass, hedge cuttings, and old plants are a valuable resource within gardens and strengthens the soil's capacity to adapt to climate change. As a waste product, it has economic and environmental costs.

 

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