Local News

Five fishermen plucked from stormy sea after trawler sinks

Thu, Jan 22, 2015

Four Galway based fishermen and a Romanian crewman are making their way home after a terrifying experience when the trawler they were fishing on sank off the west coast of Scotland on Tuesday. The men had a lucky escape as they all managed to be dramatically saved by the Scottish coastguard rescue helicopter.

Politics

‘Politicians are all the same’

Thu, Jan 22, 2015

“Politicians are all the same“ is a very common refrain these days, and although it may disturb the more idealistic candidates and their canvassers, it has more than a grain of truth. The two governments that have reigned throughout the Irish economic meltdown have pursued the same policies, making the people pay for a crisis that was none of their doing.

Al Murray as the Pub Landlord.

Shooting The Breeze

The Pub Landlord - twenty years of ‘behaving appallingly humbly’

Thu, Jan 22, 2015

IT WAS 20 years ago this year that Al Murray introduced the world to the Pub Landlord, his pompously loveable, slightly jingoistic, opinionated font of ‘common sense’, who espouses a ‘Thank God I’m an Englishman’ view of the world and hopelessly in love with being British!

Old Galway

The Patrician Brothers in Galway

Thu, Jan 15, 2015

On this day, January 15 in the year 1827, the Patrician Brothers arrived in Galway for the first time. Brothers Paul O’Connor and James Walsh took up residence in the Charity Free School in Lombard Street. Three hundred boys attended that day. This school for the poor was originally founded in 1790 in Back Street (now St Augustine Street). In 1824 it transferred to the Lombard Street barracks which had been built in 1749, and purchased from the government by Warden French in 1823. It had been a struggle to keep the school going so the Patricians were invited to take it over and manage it. The barracks formed three sides of a square, the Brothers lived in one wing and the school occupied another. It had one large room on the ground floor and one large room overhead.

Members of the Ist battalion of the Connaught Rangers in India. James Daly is bottom right (Photograph at King House Museum, Boyle).

Galway Diary

‘ When I drop this handkerchief, fire and spare no man’

Thu, Jan 15, 2015

Perhaps fearing that the refusal by Irish soldiers to carry out army duties in Wellington Barracks at Jullundur, northeast India, on June 27 1920; and that the mutiny would spread to an already sympathetic native population, leading to a general protest such as at Amritsar the previous year, the army authorities quickly took decisive action. The commanding officer, Lt Col Leeds, strode into the crowd of excited and rebellious soldiers, demanding to speak to its two leaders John Flannery and Joe Hawes. He warned the men that they could be shot for this; that such behaviour only excited the natives to rebellion. Hawes, smoking a cigarette, replied that he would rather be killed by an Indian bullet than by a British one (His disrespectful attitude to his commanding officer was noted).

Learn Spanish with us!

Education

Learn Spanish with The Spanish Institute

Thu, Jan 08, 2015

A new term of Spanish courses will begin in February at The Spanish Institute. Adult courses range from beginner to advanced and, with a variety of times available, there is an option to suit everyone.

Digital Edition

Read this weeks Digital Edition. Past editions also available from within this weeks digital copy.

 

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