Sunflowers and disintegrating lovers

Thu, May 10, 2018

THE WORK of some poets is great, or at least initially sounds great, when you hear it declaimed from a festival stage, but is rather less rewarding when read on the page, in the absence of the bells and whistles of performance.

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The life of Una Taaffe and a young man's struggle with MS

Wed, May 09, 2018

TWO LOCALLY-devised works in progress proved big hits with Tuesday’s Galway Theatre Festival audiences - Conor Geoghegan’s Invisible at Nuns Island and Elaine Mears’ Una at the Mick Lally Theatre. Both are already strong pieces of theatre and certainly whetted the appetite to see them in their finished forms.

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An 'inventive' and 'charming' Little Prince

Wed, May 09, 2018

THE LAST time I saw Morgan Creative in action was with its imaginative staging of Crime and Punishment at Druid’s Mick Lally Theatre eight months ago. This week the company returned to the Mick Lally Theatre for the Galway Theatre Festival with another a literary classic - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince.

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Album review: Liz Phair

Thu, May 03, 2018

IF MOST people found Madonna's 1992 album Erotica shocking, there was no way in 1993 the largely sexless world of indie/alternative rock was going to be able to handle Liz Phair's debut, Exile In Guyville.

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Film review: Avengers: Infinity War

Thu, May 03, 2018

FINALLY, IT'S here, has already broken records, and has the chance to be the highest grossing blockbuster of all time, finally surpassing 1997's Titanic. This is a movie that is easy to take for granted, but the scale of the story telling is a lot more impressive than any of the CGI.

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Book review: Will Galway beat Mayo?

Thu, May 03, 2018

GROWING AFFLUENCE and increased leisure time are said to be the main reasons for the growing presence of sport in the daily lives of more and more people. The sports sections in newspapers are getting bigger, and there is rarely a news bulletin on radio or TV without a sports report.

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Theatre Review: The Hired Man

Wed, May 02, 2018

LAST NIGHT, Tuesday May 1, at the Black Box Theatre, Galway Musical Society presented the opening night of its terrific production of the musical, The Hired Man, based on Melvyn Bragg's stirring novel of Cumbrian rural and industrial working life in the first quarter of the 20th century.

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Exhibition review: Mind Has Mountains

Wed, May 02, 2018

PRESENTED AS part of this year’s just-finished Cúirt International Festival of Literature, the fine group exhibition, Mind Has Mountains, is continuing at the Town Hall Theatre bar until the beginning of June and well merits a visit.

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Album review: Kacy & Clayton

Thu, Apr 26, 2018

THIS IS a new album, but the cover instantly declares that in Kacy Anderson and Clayton Linthicum's world, every day is somewhere between 1965 and 1972, an impression confirmed and copper-fastened by the music within.

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Film review: The Cured

Thu, Apr 26, 2018

SET IN Dublin a few years after a zombie outbreak, The Cured finds the world is relatively stable again. Subverting the genre before the credits even end, a cure has been found. Happy days.

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Album review: The Shacks

Thu, Apr 19, 2018

OVER THE last 10 years indie music has rediscovered and re-explored 1990s genres, but it is rare to see young musicians going back any further than that. Recently however, a new series of disparate bands - School Damage, Mermaidens, Starcrawler, and now The Shacks - have delved into different aspects of sixties and seventies rock, delivering fresh new presentations of those forms.

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Cinema review: Rampage

Thu, Apr 19, 2018

RAMPAGE OPENS in space. An off-planet research ship is breaking apart and three vials of genetic altering substance falls to earth. One of them lands in a San Diego wild life reserve run by Davis Okoye, played by Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson.

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Arrival on Irish poetry scene of true original

Thu, Apr 19, 2018

RACHEL COVENTRY was born in Scotland to an Irish mother, spent her teenage years in Galway attending the Mercy secondary school, and lived for most of the 1990s in north London.

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Album review: Hinds

Thu, Apr 12, 2018

IT says something about the confidence of Hinds, that they come up with a riff most indie bands would have killed for to built a song around, but which the Spanish quartet are content to use merely as an interlude.

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Cinema review: A Quiet Place

Thu, Apr 12, 2018

A QUIET Place is directed by John Krasinski, who most people will know as Jim from The Office, but do not let that fool you - there are no fourth wall breaking smirks to the camera here.

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Irish myth sucks in influences from Monty Python and Martin McDonagh

Tue, Apr 10, 2018

THE ANCIENT saga of Diarmuid and Grainne gets a zestful makeover from Fíbín Theatre Company in an entertaining Town Hall staging of Tóraíocht that is a leap-off for a national tour –rather like the cross-country epic of the play’s hero and heroine.

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Album review: Frankie Cosmos

Thu, Apr 05, 2018

THE MELODY and manner in which Frankie (aka Greta Kline) sings the opening line of opening track 'Caramelize', her stretching the words, making them rise and fall, as though on some blissful roller-coaster, should send a frisson of excitement through any true indie-fan.

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Cinema review: Isle Of Dogs

Thu, Apr 05, 2018

DIRECTOR WES Anderson is on a bit of a roll. His last two films, Moonrise Kingdom and The Grand Budapest Hotel, have been among his best work, but I was a little disappointed at his decision to step back into stop motion animation.

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Tom French’s variations of the sonnet

Thu, Apr 05, 2018

TOM FRENCH'S fifth collection, The Last Straw (The Gallery Press) exudes a deep sense of warmth even before it is opened. The painting illustrating the cover, Sunset, by Sadie Mackie, invites the reader to open the book and to revel in its content.

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Album review: Courtney Marie Andrews

Thu, Mar 29, 2018

TO QUOTE The Smiths' 'Sheila Take A Bow', "How can someone so young/Sing words so sad?" Courtney Marie Andrews sings like a women who has lived for twice as long, and experienced twice as much, as any 28-year-old.

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E-paper

Read this weeks E-paper. Past editions also available from within this weeks digital copy.

 

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