Search Results for 'Conor McNamara'

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Corofin round off their year with u-21 success

Corofin received some measure of consolation after their Connacht senior club championship defeat to Castlebar Mitchels when they collected the county u-21 A title after defeating old rivals Salthill/Knocknacarra by 3-11 to 1-11, at Pearse Stadium at the weekend.

St James collect first u-21 A title

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St James annexed their first ever u-21 county title on Sunday when they comprehensively defeated Corofin on a score-line of 1-19 to 2-7.

Galway 1910 - 1923, the changing years

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Early in 1916, Pádraic Pearse visited Athenry to discuss plans for the Rising. He wanted the Volunteers to hold the county at the River Suck at Ballinasloe, to capture Galway city, and then, if possible, to march on Dublin. There were several variations of this strategy, but whichever plan was finally agreed, its success depended on the Volunteers receiving modern weaponry. Up to then the men had been rehearsing with shotguns, and sticks. Pearse assured them that small arms, including assault rifles and machine guns, were on their way. They would arrive in Gort, and be distributed from there.

Fear and loathing in the towns and villages as rebels divided on continuing the struggle

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Following the news of the Rising in Dublin on Easter Monday April 25 1916, Galway was in the grip of rumour and anxiety. The Galway ‘rising’, consisting of about 600 men led by Liam Mellows, but poorly armed, was creating mayhem in the county. Police ( RIC) stations were being attacked, telegraph poles were cut down, and trains were not running. Galway was virtually cut off from news of developments elsewhere. Then panic ensued when on Tuesday a British warship, HMS Gloucester, steamed into the bay and indiscriminately opened fire into the coastline, and further inland. Refugees began to arrive in the town.

Galway - the most shoneen town in Ireland!

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On Tuesday April 26 1916, 95 years ago this week, many people in Galway town were gripped by rumour and hysteria. Rebellion in Dublin had been the sole source of conversation the evening before, but now telegraph lines were cut down, no trains were running, and news that rebellion had broken out in Oranmore, Clarinbridge and Athenry, brought events closer to home. All roads out of the town were considered too dangerous to travel. All shops and factories closed. People stood in small groups discussing the situation. There were fears that the rebels were approaching the town.*

Underdogs St Jarlath’s need a big performance to reclaim Hogan Cup

St Jarlath’s College, Tuam go in search of their 13th Hogan Cup title on Saturday in Croke Park (1.45pm).

Burke and Walsh point the way for St Jarlath’s

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St Jarlath's College qualified for the 2011 Hogan Cup final on Saturday when defeating Coláiste Chríost Rí (Cork) by 1-14 to 0-14 in a clash of all that is good in Gaelic football.

St Jarlath’s in All-Ireland semi-final

St Jarlath’s College take on old rivals Coláiste Chríost Rí (Cork) in the All Ireland Senior Schools A semi-final on Saturday (2pm) at the Claughaun GAA pitch in Limerick city.

St Jarlath’s claim Connacht A title

Three goals in a 10-minute blitzkrieg during the first half helped St Jarlath’s College secure their 47th Connacht title over a slightly unlucky Summerhill side.

Corofin edge past St James in minor A final

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The top two clubs in Galway minor football over the past five years, St James and Corofin – they have won the last five A titles between them – clashed in Pearse Stadium on Sunday in this year’s county final. On this occasion it was Ollie Burke’s Corofin outfit that collected the booty.

 

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