Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment - on stage

Classic story of examining human capacity for evil, comes to the Mick Lally Theatre

An 1874 illustration depicting characters from Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment.

An 1874 illustration depicting characters from Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment.

CRIME AND Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s classic story of murder, moral dilemma, and human capacity for evil, comes to the stage of the Mick Lally Theatre, Druid Lane, this month.

Dostoyevsky’s novel, which was originally published in 1866/67, has been adapted for the stage by Phillip McDonagh and directed by Luke Morgan. It focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St Petersburg who plans to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov, in an attempt to defend his actions, argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime.

He also commits the murder to test a theory of his that dictates some people are naturally capable of such actions, and even have the right to perform them. Throughout the novel, Raskolnikov compares himself with Napoleon Bonaparte and shares his belief that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose.

The show is presented by Morgan Creative. It runs in the Mick Lally Theatre from Monday October 23 to Sunday 28 at 8pm. Tickets are €18/15/12 via morgancreative.org/theatre The play will also be performed in Clifden tomorrow.

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