Search Results for 'the Daily Mail'

10 results found.

‘Beyond our wildest expectations’

Week III

‘Beyond our wildest expectations’

Week III

A letter to Elsie

image preview

Week II

‘A new breed of pilot emerged’

In April 1913, the Daily Mail offered £10,000 (about €500,000 today)

Alcock and Brown 100 celebrations in Clifden

image preview

When John Alcock and Arthur Brown crash-landed in Derrygilmlagh Bog, near Clifden, at 8.40am on June 15 1919, they had completed the first non-stop transatlantic flight, and ensured thei place in aviation history.

June 6 – The day democracy returned to Europe

image preview

The battle for Normandy June-August 1944, launched on D-Day exactly 75 years ago, marked, after Stalingrad, the beginning of the end of Nazi Germany. It was a major battle. The Allies suffered 209,672 casualties of whom 36,796 were killed. Some 28,000 Allied airman were lost in the months preceding and during the campaign.

'You wouldn’t believe the stuff people admit to, absolutely disgusting!'

image preview

The inimitable Russell Brand breezes into Galway next week with his superlative stand-up show, RE:BIRTH, at Leisureland on Wednesday March 14 at 8pm, where he will deals with such all-encompassing questions as 'What is real?' 'Who are we?' and 'Where did this baby come from?'

A 'Yidlife crisis' and a hit show about Jewish identity

image preview

GEFILTE FISH and Chips, the award winning show by theatre maker, songwriter, producer, and broadcaster Daniel Cainer, opens tomorrow in The Cellar Bar, as part of the Galway Fringe Festival.

That was some year

What a tumultuous political year it’s been! It began with a sense that despite much turmoil and insurgency across the globe voters would shy away from the radical choices and that something akin to the ‘status quo’ would prevail. It ended with Madonna with no sense of irony berating the President-elect of the USA for engaging in sensationalist acts and rhetoric in order to generate publicity.

‘The Galway Resolution’ - An attempted coup by some county councillors

On December 3 1920, at the height of the War of Independence, quite an extraordinary event happened in Galway County Council. It passed a resolution, known as ‘The Galway Resolution’, repudiating the authority of the newly established Dáil; it rescinded the resolution for the collection of rates, (which were collected locally, and passed on to Dáil Éireann, and not to the British authorities), and incredibly, Galway County Council now offered its offices to negotiate peace, directly with the British prime minister, David Lloyd George.

 

Page generated in 0.0388 seconds.