Search Results for 'Salmon weir'

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A summer tram on William Street, 1904

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Our photograph of William Street shows the horse-drawn open-topped summer tram heading towards the terminus on Eyre Square.

Council must act now to push €63 million 'game changing' projects, says Cllr Eddie Hoare

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An “exciting future” leading to the “transformation” of the city centre awaits Galway, but only if the €63 million in funding under the Urban Regeneration and Development Fund is “delivered in a timely manner.”

Government support vital to keeping city council deficit to a minimum, says CEO

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The intervention of the Government in funding Galway City Council played the key role in ensuring the city deficit is just a fraction of what it might have been, Galway City Council CEO Brendan McGrath said this week.

The power merchants who ruled Galway

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Under Norman rule Galway rapidly developed from an obscure village into an important seaport with trade contacts all over Europe. This transformation was entirely due to the merchant community who made themselves into an oligarchy who not only owned and directed the town’s trade, but completely controlled the municipal government, the election of mayors, and, uniquely, the appointment of priests and wardens to St Nicholas’ Collegiate church. They enjoyed total power. They lived in opulent houses, many of which had elaborately carved doorways, secure within the walls of the town, indifferent to the Gaelic natives who were kept firmly outside the gates.*

Beautiful family home by the water is a must-see

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This restored and modernised four bedroom terraced house is located in a residential district steeped in history, overlooking a tree-lined gated park in Woodquay. Less than five minutes' walk from Eyre Square, the train and bus stations, bars, restaurants, and shops, this property beautifully blends modern convenience with historic charm.

City council supports EU funding for pedestrian bridge at Salmon Weir

The Galway City Council has thrown its support behind a proposed new pedestrian footbridge over the River Corrib, adjacent to the existing Salmon Weir Bridge and in front of the cathedral.

Waterside, c1885

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Some 100 years before this photograph was taken, most of the area we are looking at would have been under water, the river covered much of what is Woodquay today. Most of the people who lived in the area would have been small farmers or fishermen, their houses (outside the city walls) made of blocks of stone, often with moss stuffed into the crevices and a roof covered partly with straw, partly with turf. The river provided a rich source of food, though in the city, the fishery, from the Salmon Weir to the sea, was privately owned.

Minister rubbishes story that Salmon Weir was for sale

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Minister for Natural Resources Sean Kyne has rubbished a circulating story that the Salmon Weir might be put up for sale.

The Dyke Road

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The Dyke Road was originally known as the Terryland Embankment. In 1847 a group known as The Corrib Development Company applied for compensation claiming they had spent a considerable sum constructing the embankment — at the time the river was prone to serious flooding. The Commissioner for Public Works took over possession of the works after giving evidence in reply to the claim for compensation. They pointed out that the embankment was partially built in 1839, but after the water had risen that winter, it had given way. The company carried out more works of reconstruction in 1840, but the flood waters burst it again. The river would flood on each occasion as far as Castlegar. The embankment was left unfinished until 1845 when the company tried once more but failed to retain the river. They were subsequently compensated. The building of the canal a few years later greatly alleviated the flooding problems.

‘A ghostly presence through trees and over bog’

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One of Ireland’s great engineering feats in the 19th century was the building of the Galway - Clifden railway. After 30 years of argument as to which was the best route, the first train steamed out of Galway to Oughterard on January 1 1895; and the final section to Clifden was finished by July of that year.

 

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