Search Results for 'Salmon Weir bridge'

24 results found.

The Salmon Weir Bridge

image preview

The original purpose of the structure that is the Salmon Weir Bridge was to connect the new County Courthouse with the County Gaol on Nuns Island. Urban folklore has it that they built a tunnel under the river at the time in order to transfer prisoners from one building to the other, but why would they construct a crossing over and under the water at the same time? It does not make sense. The building of the seven span bridge started in 1818 and finished in 1819.

Prime city centre investment property

image preview

O'Donnellan & Joyce is seeking expressions of interest in this prime city centre premises. In terms of location, Waterside House has it all — situated moments from the heart of Galway city while enjoying a peaceful setting overlooking the River Corrib and the Salmon Weir Bridge.

Salmon Weir pedestrian bridge should instead by used for public transport

image preview

A Fianna Fáil candidate is calling for the proposed new pedestrian bridge over the River Corrib to be instead used for vehicles, especially for public transport, and for the Salmon Weir Bridge to become pedestrianised.

City council supports EU funding for pedestrian bridge at Salmon Weir

The Galway City Council has thrown its support behind a proposed new pedestrian footbridge over the River Corrib, adjacent to the existing Salmon Weir Bridge and in front of the cathedral.

Galway roads to benefit from €32 million in Government funding

A total of €31.7 million has been allocated to the Galway city and county councils for repairs, maintenance, and improvements to the city and county road network.

Salmon Weir pedestrian bridge will not make Galway 'pedestrian friendly city'

image preview

Constructing a pedestrian bridge parallel to the Salmon Weir Bridge will not, of itself, make Galway a pedestrian friendly city, especially when the plans for the proposed new bridge have "severe limitations".

A prison drama in the Town hall

image preview

November 1920 was the most vicious month in the War of Independence. Murder and mayhem were commonplace. The authorities reacted with vigorous severity. There were shootings and public beatings, buildings and homes burnt, and printing works wrecked. There was a sweeping roundup of the usual suspects, numbering in their thousands. The old gaol in Galway, and gaols throughout Ireland, were full to bursting point.

'Samhain and Macnas suit each other'

image preview

The word “energy” peppers Noeline Kavanagh’s conversation as she talks about her time with Macnas and looks forward to this weekend’s Halloween parade, Out Of The Wild Sky. Kavanagh herself is a human dynamo; though sitting at her office desk she is still a constant whirr of motioning arms, expressive gestures, and infectious enthusiasm.

Macnas parade 2018 - hypnotic, intoxicating, mysterious

image preview

OUT OF The Wild Sky, the 2018 Macnas Halloween parade, celebrating the act of transformation, creating in its wake, a hypnotic, intoxicating, glittering, mysterious world, filled with shadow and nobility, takes place next week.

Sabina Niguez - casting a Spanish eye on Galwegian life

image preview

GALWAY HAS long prided itself on its historic Spanish links but an exhibition currently showing in the Black Gate makes a modern connection between Spain and the city. The work is by Spanish artist Sabina Niguez who hails originally from Alicante but has been living in Galway for the past four years.

 

Page generated in 0.0450 seconds.