Search Results for 'Historical Society'

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‘What do you think of that, Mr McDonogh?’

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I think that even today if a 21 years old woman applied for permanency to her job as Galway county surveyor, which she held from December 1906 for five months, and was turned down due to her young age and lack of experience, most of us would not be surprised.

The ‘blue moonlight’ of Galway 1893

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Our Swedish journalist Hugo Vallentin arrived in Galway in the late summer of 1893. He had spent the previous weeks travelling through Dublin, Cork, Killarney and Limerick, assessing people’s reactions to the progress of Gladstone’s Second Home Rule act, which he believed was a question of interest to the whole ‘civilised world’.

The ‘blue moonlight’ of Galway 1893

Our Swedish journalist Hugo Vallentin arrived in Galway in the late summer of 1893. He had spent the previous weeks travelling through Dublin, Cork, Killarney and Limerick, assessing people’s reactions to the progress of Gladstone’s Second Home Rule act, which he believed was a question of interest to the whole ‘civilised world’.

A Swedish view of Ireland 1893

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Near by the ruins of Menlo Castle, built by the Blake family in 1569, is the village of Menlo, a small attractive cluster of houses, that appear to have grown near each other by accident, as it zigzags down to the river bank. There is no village centre as such, but its very irregularity has made it a desirable place to live. Today it is a prosperous suburb of Galway city.

The call of St James was heard once more...

Seventy years after Margaret Athy’s generous patronage of the Augustine abbey and buildings on Fort Hill (originally St Augustine’s Hill), with its commanding view of the port and the town, the place was turned into a butcher’s block. Approximately 300 survivors of the ill-fated Armada were beheaded there.

A ‘cheerful, and amiable saint’.

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In the early years of the 16th century, Stephen Lynch fitz Dominick was returning from an extended trading voyage in Spain. He set out with a full cargo, probably of hides, wool, and fish, which he hoped to trade for wine and iron with Spanish merchants. As he approached Galway port he was surprised to see a church and buildings almost completed on Fort Hill (originally called St Augustine’s Hill), a prominent site visible from both the town and the sea. They were not there when he left.

O'Hara to give next Charlestown lecture

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Bernard O’Hara, author of the book Exploring Mayo, will deliver the next lecture in a series of lectures currently under way in Charlestown Library on Thursday, January 17 at 7.30pm.

Was Britain, not Germany, responsible for the start of WWI?

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"THE FIRST World War, it came and it went, the reasons for fighting I never did get," sang Bob Dylan on 'With God On Our Side', and unlike WWI, the Great War's causes are complex and not straightforward.

East Mayo Community Diary

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If you would like an item included in the East Mayo Community Diary, please submit it to [email protected] by 5.30pm on the Monday before the next publication date.

Lecture examines the history of the NSPCC in Galway

A lecture hosted by the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society will examine the history of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children in Galway.

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