Search Results for 'Great Southern Hotel'

19 results found.

Ulysses - and gun fire in Galway

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Nora’s last visit to Galway in April 1922 did not go well. Galway, as well as the country, was caught up in a deadly Civil War. The anti -Treaty forces had occupied the Connaught Rangers’ Barracks, Renmore, while the pro- Treaty forces occupied the Great Southern Hotel. The Galway to Dublin train was regularly fired upon from the barracks. There were sporadic gun fights around the Custom House, and the Masonic hall, as both sides struggled for possession. It was a dangerous time and people were fearful.

Kenny's Bookshop and Gallery at 80

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On a day in October 1936, a young woman, Maureen Canning, from Mohill, County Leitrim, left her digs in Lower Salthill and began to walk, for the first time, to what was then University College Galway.

Galway’s biographer to the stars presents fascinating tale of Paddy Cole

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Galway writer Tom Gilmore, who is fast building a reputation as the biographer of top music stars has added another to his literary stable with his new book King of the Swingers, the official biography of the great Paddy Cole.

Poems for the Lockdown - Eyre Square

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THIS POEM was written for a poetry competition the Galway City Council organised on the theme of ‘Eyre Square’ and it featured in my fourth poetry collection, The Ghost In The Lobby, published by Salmon in 2014.

Cunninghams Pharmacy Monksland attains major award

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Cunningham’s Pharmacy, Monksland, have been announced as National Pharmacy of the Year 2020, at a gala black tie event in the Great Southern Hotel, Killarney, last weekend.

Gaslight at The Meyrick

The Meyrick has long had a special place in the hearts of the people of Galway. Known as the Railway Hotel when it opened in 1852, and later as the Great Southern Hotel, this stately showpiece looms large over Eyre Square. In 2006 it was re-named the Hotel Meyrick in order to maintain a link to its historical background, as Eyre Square was once named Meyrick Square. The hotel then underwent a refurbishment programme intended to reinstate the grandeur and elegance of its 19th century heyday, marble flooring, high ceilings, chandeliers, and rich fabrics all contribute to recreating the grandeur of old.

Druid, forty years in the lane

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Druid Theatre Company was founded in May 1975 with the initial aim of providing theatre entertainment for tourists in Galway. It opened with three full length plays on successive nights in the Jesuit Hall. The season was a success so they made the very brave decision to operate the company on a full-time basis. Their productions were presented on a fit-up basis, as were a number of lunchtime shows in the Fo’Castle in Dominick Street. They converted this latter venue into a fully equipped pocket theatre seating 47 people. It was a popular venue, well supported, but there were problems with regard to backstage, storage, and office space.

Dara Calleary TD named Retail Advocate of the Year

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A Mayo TD has been recognised for his work advocating on behalf of the retail industry, at the recent Retail Excellence Awards Night held in Dublin.

Gaslight at The Meyrick

The Meyrick has long had a special place in the hearts of the people of Galway. Known as the Railway Hotel when it opened in 1852, and later as the Great Southern Hotel, this stately showpiece looms large over Eyre Square. In 2006 it was renamed the Hotel Meyrick in order to maintain a link to its historical background, as Eyre Square was once named Meyrick Square. The hotel then underwent a refurbishment programme intended to reinstate the grandeur and elegance of its 19th century heyday, marble flooring, high ceilings, chandeliers and rich fabrics all contribute to re-creating the grandeur of old.

Part of Forster Street, 1905

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This photograph, taken from an old glass slide, shows some important personage in an escorted carriage leaving the Great Southern Hotel. There are some mounted liveried gentlemen in front and two RIC men on horseback behind the carriage, which is hidden by the RIC men. You can see a policeman on foot to the right of our picture.

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