Search Results for 'Great Famine'

44 results found.

‘It was the landlord’s right to do as he pleased.’

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The succession by the infamous Marcella Netterville to a large estate near Mount Bellew, Co Galway, in the 1820s owed as much to chance as it was to her unlikely mother-in-law, with the wonderful name, Kitty Cut-a-Dash. The Nettervilles were an ancient Norman family, who came to Galway from County Meath after purchasing land from the Bellew family. A judicious marriage with the Trenchs of Garbally, Ballinasloe, increased their holdings. It appears that for a time both the Nettervilles and their tenants lived at peace and in some prosperity, at least until Frederick Netterville began to spread his wild oats somewhat wide of the field.

Swinford famine grave

A Great Famine grave in Swinford, where 564 victims are buried, has been restored and commemorated.

A royal visitor in ‘Pollok’s Time’

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Earlier this year Galway Diary discussed the evictions implemented by Marcella Netterville and John Gerrard on their 7,000 acre estate at Ballinlass, near Mount Bellew Co Galway. In 1846 more that 400 families were heartlessly thrown out on the road, without any compensation. The land was being cleared to fatten cattle, which would have been far more profitable than tenants; many of whom, as the Great Famine tightened its terrible grip, were unable to pay their way. The Times of London famously commented that the Ballinlass evictions showed ‘the sublime indifference to social considerations of which no one but an Irish landowner is capable.’

NUIG school of humanities to host public famine talks

NUI Galway’s School of Humanities is hosting two public events this weekend on the topic of famine, and on the Great Irish Famine in particular.

Two book launches in Galway

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TWO WORKS, one a historical account of reactions to the Famine, another a historical novel set in Mayo, are to be launched in Galway.

The heartless evictions from the Gerrard estate, 1846

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Friday March 13 1846 turned out to be a very unlucky day for the 447 tenants on the Gerrard estate in the townland of Ballinlass, near Mount Bellew Co Galway. Shortly after dawn the sheriff, accompanied by a large force of the 49th Regiment under the command of Captain Browne, and an equally large detachment of police, arrived at ‘the place marked out for destruction.’ Despite the vehement protestations of the people, and their insistence that they had their rent money ready for payment, and that their repeated efforts to pay their rent was refused, the soldiers and police began systematically to demolish their homes, 67 in number. *

'It was Christmas day in the workhouse..'

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Many people will be familiar with the first line of this famous Victorian dramatic monologue, written by the English journalist George R Sims in 1879.

Fix National Famine Commemoration date says Galway senator

A Galway senator is calling for Arts Minister, Jimmy Deenihan, to officially set a date for the Famine Commemoration Day to not only acknowledge this significant event in Irish history but also to fully capitalise on the forthcoming Gathering events planned for 2013.

Ceremony to remember Galway Famine victims

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Galwegians who died aboard the Famine ships, those who made it start a new life in Canada and the US, and those who manned the ships that bore them will be honoured in the city next week.

Commemorative Famine Walk in Ballina

Gorta is to hold a remembrance Famine Walk in Ballina on May 7 at 2pm. The family walk, through Belleek Woods, is to honour the journey made by a Mayo family during the Great Famine.

 

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