Search Results for 'General'

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Galway’s secret ministry during Penal Times

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The Treaty of Limerick, October 3 1691, which was mainly a military success for the Irish/Jacobite army, was indecisive on its civil articles; and those which were agreed were soon ignored by a vengeful Protestant parliament.

A time when grass grew on Galway streets

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It is generally agreed that the treaty signed between the Williamite general de Ginkel, and the Irish/Jacobian Patrick Sarsfield, on October 9 1691 in Limerick, was a very satisfactory military outcome for both sides, but not a satisfactory outcome for Catholic Ireland who, with the loss of her armies, was left at the mercy of a vengeful Protestant parliament.

Galway awaits its fate in ‘a state of nervousness and excitement’

Following the victory of King William’s army at Aughrim July 12 1691, the people of Galway awaited their fate in fear and uncertainty. William’s Dutch general Godert de Ginkel, had moved from his headquarters at Athenry, and was now on his way to subdue the town. He had shown ruthless determination in his dealings with the Irish Jacobite army; the citizens must have expected nothing less.

Treachery at Aughrim

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The last conventional battle in Irish history was fought on Sunday July 12 1691 at Aughrim, Co Galway. It was by far the bloodiest. In less than 8 hours approximately 8,000 men were killed. Six thousand of them were Irish Jacobites.

‘A pale granite dream, afloat on its own reflection’

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Mitchell Henry’s final days in Kylemore were sad ones. His adored wife Margaret had died at 45 years-of-age, and rested in a simple brick mausoleum in the grounds of his palatial Kylemore Castle. His political life, into which he put a great deal of personal effort, advocating on behalf of all Irish tenants the rights for them to own their own land, was out manoeuvred by Charles Stewart Parnell and the Land League. Henry described the Land League methods as ‘dishonest, demoralising and unChristian’. He probably was not surprised to lose his Galway seat in the general election of 1885. He blamed ‘Parnellite intimidation’.

Calls for Columbus monument in Galway and Confederate plaque in Tuam to be removed

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Monuments in Galway city and Tuam, which honour people who were directly involved in the slave trade or who fought to maintain slavery, should be removed.

Covid impact on council finances laid out

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The elected members of Ballina Municipal District have been told that the council will only be committing 50 per cent of the previously budgeted for General Municipal Allocations, up to the end of July this year, owing to the current financial situation the council finds itself in due to a drop in income due to Covid-19.

Seven new NUI Galway projects to respond to COVID-19 crisis

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Seven new NUI Galway projects to respond to the COVID-19 emergency were announced by Minister for Business, Enterprise, and Innovation, Heather Humphreys, TD yesterday (Wednesday) evening.

Gentex FC - a club with a proud sporting history

 

The names on the Autograph Tree at Coole

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It may seem out of place that the name Robert (known as Robbie) Ross is associated with probably the best known literary monument in Ireland, namely the autograph tree at Coole Park. With the exception of two soldiers’ names, all 24 others are poets, writers and artists all of whom Lady Gregory believed were worthy to be included in her particular and original ‘hall of fame.’

 

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