Search Results for 'Famine'

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The Great Famine - A watershed in Irish history

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During the seven years of the Great Famine approximately one million people died. A million more emigrated causing Ireland’s population to fall by between 20 and 25 per cent. The initial cause of famine was a potato disease which ravaged potato crops throughout Europe during the 1840s.

A ‘selfish, perverse and turbulent’ people

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As the Great Famine strengthened its fearsome grip on Ireland in the late 1840s and early 1850s, the people were doubly unfortunate that Charles Trevelyan, the Assistant Secretary to the British Treasury, had responsibility for Irish Famine relief.

How artists changed Britain’s perception of the Great Hunger

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Although the Great Irish Famine, which devastated Ireland in the 1840s and early 1850s, happened at a time when photography was only in its experimental stage, we still have vivid images of the appalling suffering that the vast majority of the people endured. A suffering that was heightened by systematic neglect by government, the total absence of a comprehensive humanitarian plan of relief, and the law of the land which only supported the rights of landlords.*

Galway people invited to get involved in the Great Ethiopian Run

With the deadline for entry into the Great Ethiopian Run/Walk 2014 fast approaching, Ronan Scully of Gorta-Self Help Africa is calling on Galway people to sign up for this epic fundraising adventure.

Three day conference on The Great Famine

A three-day conference on The Great Famine, featuring Irish and American academics, will take place this weekend in Ballinasloe.

Famine documentary to be broadcast this weekend

A programme looking at the first forced emigration scheme on the Mahon Estate in Strokestown, County Roscommon during the Great Irish Famine, is to broadcast on Shannonside Northern Sound.

‘It was the landlord’s right to do as he pleased.’

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The succession by the infamous Marcella Netterville to a large estate near Mount Bellew, Co Galway, in the 1820s owed as much to chance as it was to her unlikely mother-in-law, with the wonderful name, Kitty Cut-a-Dash. The Nettervilles were an ancient Norman family, who came to Galway from County Meath after purchasing land from the Bellew family. A judicious marriage with the Trenchs of Garbally, Ballinasloe, increased their holdings. It appears that for a time both the Nettervilles and their tenants lived at peace and in some prosperity, at least until Frederick Netterville began to spread his wild oats somewhat wide of the field.

NUIG school of humanities to host public famine talks

NUI Galway’s School of Humanities is hosting two public events this weekend on the topic of famine, and on the Great Irish Famine in particular.

Commemorative Famine Walk in Ballina

Gorta is to hold a remembrance Famine Walk in Ballina on May 7 at 2pm. The family walk, through Belleek Woods, is to honour the journey made by a Mayo family during the Great Famine.

Public lecture on The Famine takes place tonight

Mark Kennedy, a driving force behind The Galway Famine Memorial committee and the Galway Famine Ship Memorial Project, will give a public lecture on The Famine tonight.

 

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