Search Results for 'British army'

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'A small, fast ferry in the west; it would be right up your street'

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A WELL Spent Smile is the title of an engaging collection of poetry recently published by Robert Hilton, captain of The Aran Flyer ferry. The ups and downs of Hilton’s long seafaring life infuse poems that are sometimes funny, sometimes serious, and constantly a pleasure to read.

June 6 – The day democracy returned to Europe

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The battle for Normandy June-August 1944, launched on D-Day exactly 75 years ago, marked, after Stalingrad, the beginning of the end of Nazi Germany. It was a major battle. The Allies suffered 209,672 casualties of whom 36,796 were killed. Some 28,000 Allied airman were lost in the months preceding and during the campaign.

The Galway General Omnibus Company

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The first regular public transport service in Galway was run by the Galway and Salthill Tramway Company which started business on October 1, 1879, and by 1885 was being used by in excess of 105,000 passengers per year. During World War I, most of the company’s best horses were commandeered by the British Army and there was more and more competition from motorised vehicles, so the tramway ceased trading in April 1918.

Friends in strange places.

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Our friend ‘Captain H’ who had ingeniously planted a dictaphone in the confessional under the stairs in the Town Hall prison, was up to his old tricks again. Somehow he had managed to plant a ‘friendly’ Sergeant Gates who chatted and smiled, and was a friend to all, and dangerously caught numerous snatches of conversation from the hundreds of prisoners within. These were reported to Captain H.

Remembering Elizabeth Ellam

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My great grandmother, Elizabeth Ellam, was killed on the RMS Leinster when on October 10 1918, exploded and sank following a ruthless German submarine attack shortly after the ship had departed Dun Laoghaire, on her way to Holyhead in Wales. It was practically one month to the day before World War I was declared officially over.

Soldier Still - “dark, arresting, violent, moving”

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INSPIRED BY interviews with current and former soldiers from the Irish Defence Forces, the British army, and survivors of the Bosnian war, Soldier Still, the critically acclaimed new production by Junk Ensemble, is coming to Galway next week.

Novelist commits crime of knowing what he’s talking about

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THE PROBLEM some people have with Danny Morrison’s novels is that, throughout them, he commits the heinous crime of knowing what he’s talking about. Had he been a US soldier returned from Vietnam, Iraq, or Afghanistan, it would be perfectly acceptable for him to write about his war.

Ballina Lions Club presents screening of Black 47 famine movie

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Ballina Lions Club will present a screening of Black 47, Lance Daly’s film about the Irish Famine, in Ballina Arts Centre on Tuesday October 9.

Time the so called Republican Movement apologised and compensated

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Insider has been a keen observer of the political scene for well over 40 years, and, up until recently, thought he had seen and heard it all. There were many contenders for the ‘Brass Neck’ award over the years - from Charlie Haughey’s ‘doing the State some service’ to Ray Burke’s ‘line in the sand’ to Bertie Aherne's ‘won it on the horses’.

How World War I changed Galway’s horsepower

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Salthill began to really liven up with the arrival of the Dublin to Galway train in 1851. Holidaymakers arrived at the resort in some style. Trains were met at the station by horse-drawn ‘cars’ or ‘buses’ which went out directly to the seaside.

 

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