Search Results for 'www.slinuacareers.com/galway-office'

18 results found.

Eight reasons why a short course can be a winner

Q: I want to improve my skills with a view to advancing in my career. I have looked at a few courses on sites such as Alison.com and Udemy.com, and they look good, but they don't seem to have great accreditation. Should I bother with them?

Saying less to say more

Q: I’ve often been told I talk too much. Guilty, as charged, I’d say. I haven’t done well in interviews – well, I haven’t got jobs even when I definitely had the experience. I fear I may have rabbited on too long. How might I curb this tendency? (UK).

Strong push can take you over the line

Q: I am going for an interview in my company and the field is bound to be very competitive. It’s a great job. People from inside the company are eyeing it up, as are others from similar companies. A woman could get nervous thinking about the opposition. How should I approach the interview? (OL, email).

Watch the gap – and go for it

Q: I felt the questions didn’t suit me, as Larry Gogan was fond of saying on the Just-a-Minute quiz many moons ago. They didn’t really ask me what I’d bring to the role – they were totally fixated on what I thought about the position. How could I have handled the interview differently? (TH, email).

Twenty things a good MC does

Q: This might be an unusual one, but as it’s related to my career, I said I’d run it by you. Next week, I’ve been asked to act as MC for an event we are running. All our big customers will be there, and so will all our head buck cats. I want to make a good impression. It’s a huge affair – about 400 people and the full audio-visual treatment. I was picked because I’m a pretty good talker but this is a whole other level of stuff. Any tips? (M McM, email).

Four questions to ask at the end of the interview

Q: I'm always asked at the end of the interview if I have a question for them. I can never think of what to say. I'm generally dying to make my escape. Any suggestions? (EK, email).

Your Career, Your Choices

Q: “I am a qualified and experienced teacher looking for a permanent teaching post. I have subbed, filled-in and temped for two years now. I know I am a good teacher; I love my job and my students, but am always being pipped at the post when it comes to interview. What might I be doing wrong, please advise?” – AQ (email).

You’re the presentation – not the slideshow

Q: I’ve an interview for manager of a business incubation centre. They want me to present for ten minutes on ‘What I will achieve in the first year’ – but, and here’s the rub, they have stipulated that I can’t use PowerPoint or Prezi. Zero technology. How should I approach this? (EH, email).

Your Career, Your Choices

Q: “I come from the other side of the fence - I work in HR and sit on interview panels a few times a month. One thing that really galls me is when a candidate communicates with only one or two members of a three-person panel. I’ve seen engineers only properly engage with the engineer on the panel. It always annoys me and turns me against the candidate. Perhaps it is a topic on which you could elaborate?” - DC, email.

How to make your overseas experience work at home

Q: “I have been working as a primary school teacher in London for six years. I’ve worked in some challenging schools, to say the least – in almost every class, I had children from backgrounds where drug and alcohol misuse was rampant. Behaviour was a constant issue in those schools. I have got on quite well. I’ve also done some courses on school leadership. Now I want to move back to my home place in rural Ireland. I’m afraid that what I have done in London won’t really be relevant to rural or small town schools in Ireland, and that I should tone down my CV. Any advice?” (CT, email).

  • 1 (current)
  • 2
 

Page generated in 0.0451 seconds.