Search Results for 'www.SliNuaCareers.com'

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How to make your career history work with – not against – you

Q: I've got past the first two interviews for a major post I am chasing in a new company, and now, as I get ready for the third, they've insisted that they want to talk to the general manager of the company where I worked prior to my current role. This causes me a big problem as I did not have a good relationship with this person. In fact, he was the reason I left the company. Various other senior figures within that company would vouch for me, just not the general manager. What should I do? (IK, email).

I chanced my arm – and got caught

Q: I was poorly prepared for the interview. I chanced my arm. I hadn’t practiced my answers, and I got thrown off by some easy questions. For example, I struggled on what I knew about the company (little or nothing); why I was leaving my current job (my time there is done, and this was a good opportunity to get into a new company, even though I’d initially be taking a step sideways); and did I think I was over-qualified for the position (the actual answer is ‘kind of’, but I wanted to get into the new company and go up the ladder there). I didn’t get the job. Any pointers? (DG, email).

I chanced my arm – and got caught

Q: I was poorly prepared for the interview. I chanced my arm. I hadn’t practiced my answers, and I got thrown off by some easy questions. For example, I struggled on what I knew about the company (little or nothing); why I was leaving my current job (my time there is done, and this was a good opportunity to get into a new company, even though I’d initially be taking a step sideways); and did I think I was over-qualified for the position (the actual answer is ‘kind of’, but I wanted to get into the new company and go up the ladder there). I didn’t get the job. Any pointers? (DG, email).

How to really make your ‘dream job’ work for you

Q: I am going for an interview in a company next week. A friend of mine went for an interview there about a year ago and a question that really threw her was “identify your dream job – and why?” She reckons she made a complete mess of it. How can I get my head around this if it comes up again? (DF, email).

How to make your ‘dream job’ work for you

Q: I am going for an interview in a company next week. A friend of mine went for an interview there about a year ago and a question that really threw her was “identify your dream job – and why?” She reckons she made a complete mess of it. How can I get my head around this if it comes up again? (DF, email).

No stress, how I learned from the tough days

Q: I was surprised when one of the interviewers asked me how I handled stressful situations at work. I tried to tell her that I didn’t really feel stress on the job, but she didn’t buy it. I mumbled something about a time when our main suppliers had a major supply line issue, but the answer didn’t really go anywhere. How should I have approached this answer? (EF, email).

No stress, how I learned from the tough days

Q: I was surprised when one of the interviewers asked me how I handled stressful situations at work. I tried to tell her that I didn’t really feel stress on the job, but she didn’t buy it. I mumbled something about a time when our main suppliers had a major supply line issue, but the answer didn’t really go anywhere. How should I have approached this answer? (EF, email).

How to show you’ve learned from the bad day

Q: In the interview, they asked me to outline a scenario where I had a problem in my workplace. I tried to fudge it but they were very keen to get a hard-and-fast example. I told them about an error which halted production for a few hours. But I didn't really elaborate, and I don't think the answer cut it. I didn't get the job. Any thoughts?

Seven errors you need to avoid in a job interview

1. Showing lack of interest. Going through the motions is a no-no. You simply must display enthusiasm for the role, no matter how good you are at your job, or how mundane you think it is. If you can’t muster enthusiasm for the interview, they will likely conclude you won’t bring a great deal of life to the job itself.

How to make the most of second college chance

Q: I started a college degree, but I was young and foolish, and the course didn’t suit me. I lumbered along for a year and a half before cutting my (well, my parents’) losses. The following year I started again and this time I enjoyed the course much more and saw it through to completion, and even went on to get a masters earlier this summer. I’m now writing my CV as I go job-searching in earnest for the first time. Should I even mention the earlier course? I don’t want them to think I’m a quitter (AC, email).

 

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