Search Results for 'policeman'

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British Army and RIC unleash terror on the streets of Clifden

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March 1921 saw the British army's D Company Auxiliaries continue their tour of east Galway, assisted by an RAF spotter plane, the RIC, the Black and Tans, and various members of the Crown Forces.

'If one policeman is shot here up goes the town'

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By early 1921 Britain’s war in Ireland was not just a moral issue, but a financial one. The sheer expense of solving 'The Irish Question', considering financial reparation for the loss of civilian life and destruction of private property, along with the price tag of the Crown Forces’ operations in Ireland, was staggering.

100 years since Oranmore’s Joe Howley was shot

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In the centre of Oranmore, stands a statue to a local man who was shot in Dublin one hundred years ago this week. Joe Howley, Officer Commanding Number One Brigade IRA Galway was killed leaving what is now Heuston Station, Dublin on December 4 1920, and was pronounced dead at 12.30 a.m. December 5 in George V Hospital Dublin.

Why a political revolt by Ireland’s under twenty fives is now a certainty

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One recent evening Insider watched the 1967 Jean-Luc Godard film La Chinoise in which a small group of French students sit around their apartment, located in what is described as a “workers’ district”, and engage in theatrical discussions about how they must overthrow the bourgeoise and, in particular, the hierarchal French university system which saw students as passive receivers of knowledge handed down by their god-like professors, rather than participants in a dialectical exchange in which both students and teachers learn from each other and grow as a result. No one, with the exception of chairman Mao, is radical enough for most of these students. The French Communist Party which, to draw an Irish parallel, would have been more or less the political equivalent of present day Sinn Féin, is condemned as hopelessly “revisionist”. The Soviet Union, in particular its then president, the now largely forgotten Mr Kosygin, is convicted by the students at their kitchen table discussions of failing to do enough to support the Vietnamese in their war against Lyndon Johnson. And the French working class, with whom said kitchen table debaters absolutely sympathise, are seen as hopelessly passive. In a mix of desperation, madness, and idealism, the students decide to mount a campaign of terrorism, which will involve them doing something they have singularly failed to do for most of the film; getting up from that kitchen table and going outside. They plan to kill the visiting Soviet minister for culture who has been invited by President de Gaulle’s own culture minister, the novelist and decayed Stalinist intellectual Andre Malraux, to open a new wing of the university. After that, they hope to bomb the Sorbonne in the belief that this will spark a revolution. Insider is against blowing up universities. Partly because he knows such actions more often provoke backlash than revolution. But also because Insider happens to teach at a university and coming out in favour of blowing up universities might lead to an awkward email from one’s department head.

Les Misérables; a tension filled look at France's uneasy problem

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Little did I know when I had left my recliner seat in screen seven at Omniplex Salthill on Thursday October 1 that it would be my last cinema experience for the foreseeable future as a level three lockdown was enforced the next Tuesday. But like most things in life, it is always good to go out with a bang and Les Misérables certainly provides plenty.

What Do You Mean You Haven't Read...?

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Rev Lynda Peilow, rector, St Nicholas' Collegiate Church

Best foreign language shows to help you learn a new tongue

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There is no point in beating around the bush; life under lockdown is pretty boring. We have gone from having a world of options from which to choose such as playing sport; shopping for leisure; or simply just calling round to our friends' houses and hanging out, to essentially, sitting in our homes all day and perhaps going for a walk in a secluded area.

Best foreign language shows to help you learn a new tongue

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There is no point in beating around the bush; life under lockdown is pretty boring. We have gone from having a world of options from which to choose such as playing sport; shopping for leisure; or simply just calling round to our friends' houses and hanging out, to essentially, sitting in our homes all day and perhaps going for a walk in a secluded area.

Best foreign language shows to help you learn a new tongue

BY MATT CASSIDY

John Lynn - Irish comedy's 'rising star' for the Róisín

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JOHN LYNN, "the rising star of Irish comedy," according to The Sunday Times, and a man simply declared “brilliant” by The Irish Times, headlines next week's Comedy KARLnival at the Róisín Dubh.

 

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