Search Results for 'bank accounts'

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Healy questions Irish Water letter demanding bank account details

Irish Water is set to demand the personal details, including bank account and PPS numbers, of households throughout County Galway in September.

Switching bank accounts is easy, says Bank of Ireland

All banks are reporting a significant spike in the numbers of customers switching bank accounts in recent weeks, primarily due to the withdrawal of providers from the Irish market. For those with multiple accounts linked to their current account and numerous direct debits, credits and standing orders it can appear daunting. What most people don’t realise is that your new banking provider does most of the work for you and will have your new account up and running within ten days. You just need to remember to cancel your old account.

Anti-Austerity Alliance to run candidate in city centre

Sean Byrne has been selected as the Anti-Austerity Alliance’s Galway City Central candidate for next May’s Local Elections.

RB Relocations offers personalised service to the corporate market

RB Relocations has re-launched its website to celebrate 16 years in business. The Galway company is the only local business to provide a comprehensive range of relocation and destination services for Galway and the West of Ireland’s growing corporate market and to individuals and their families.

More than €1 billion to be paid to farmers by year end — Mulherin

Fine Gael TD for Mayo Michelle Mulherin has welcomed the announcement by the Minister of Agriculture of the advance payment of €487 million in Single Farm Payments (SFP) to 101,000 farmers. The payments have been brought forward from December to October following representations made by Minister Coveney to the EU Commission.

Shooting the Breeze with... Fintan Coen and Lisa Ruane

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Mayo native Lisa Ruane and her Roscommon boyfriend Fintan Coen enjoyed a cup of tea on Monday in the comfort of Lisa’s home in Belcarra. As they looked back over the events of the previous week - their terrifying ordeal trying to flee from war torn Libya - the reality of what they had been through was sinking in.

Irishman who returns from Thailand to ‘sign on' charged with fraud

A man has appeared in court in Mullingar this week charged with defrauding the Department of Social Protection of thousands of euro over four years.

Relief for risk-takers will come from taking personal responsibility for actions

Apparently what we are seeing now in terms of house repossessions, company bankruptcies and one-time big business honchos being hauled before the courts for bad debts, is only the first wave in what is predicted to be a tsunami of personal financial horror stories. This is because up to now, as bad as things appeared on the outside, ducking and diving have actually been the two main activities keeping people going since the economic crisis began. What this means in real terms is that instead of facing up to debts as soon as they hit, many in trouble adopted the ‘head in the sand’ approach, shoving their problems deep under the rug that time forgot, never to be retrieved again unless under threat of a shotgun to the head.

‘Black Thursday’ breaking point can also open our eyes to new opportunities

The dizzying scale of Irish debt as finally revealed by the financial and state authorities yesterday will have no doubt left most of us reeling from shock and anger. Already dubbed ‘Black Thursday’, the figure of more than €35 billion now defined as the outer limits of what we must raise in order to pay off government liabilities, is staggering. The news of a further €3 billion bail-out required for AIB, that will effectively nationalise the country’s largest bank with money taken from our own National Reserve Pension Fund, can only be described as sickening. Coming one on top of the other in the face of the international markets deeming Ireland a no-confidence zone, it feels like we are just being socked in the stomach over and over again. How many more body blows can we endure?

‘Black Thursday’ breaking point can also open our eyes to new opportunities

The dizzying scale of Irish debt as finally revealed by the financial and state authorities yesterday will have no doubt left most of us reeling from shock and anger. Already dubbed ‘Black Thursday’, the figure of more than €35 billion now defined as the outer limits of what we must raise in order to pay off government liabilities, is staggering. The news of a further €3 billion bail-out required for AIB, that will effectively nationalise the country’s largest bank with money taken from our own National Reserve Pension Fund, can only be described as sickening. Coming one on top of the other in the face of the international markets deeming Ireland a no-confidence zone, it feels like we are just being socked in the stomach over and over again. How many more body blows can we endure?

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