Search Results for 'Wolfe Tone Bridge'

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The turf market at Raven Terrace

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Turf was an important and indigenous fuel and so turf markets were an important factor in Galway life (long before anyone ever thought of carbon emissions), especially at this time of year as one prepared to head into winter. Farmers from Rahoon or Barna or surrounding areas would bring their neatly stacked cartloads of turf into town and sometimes go from door to door trying to sell their product. Those who did not have particular customers more often than not would go to designated turf market locations such as Eyre Square, Woodquay, the Small Crane, or Raven Terrace/Garryglass at the corner of Wolfe Tone Bridge. There was a weighbridge opposite where the fire station is now, and this was often used in their transactions. Having sold or bartered their turf, the farmer would then deliver it to the customer.

The Spanish Arch from Long Walk

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Long Walk was originally built as a wall by the Eyre family in order to construct a mud berth. Among those who lived there around the time this photograph was taken were Tom Gannon, Sarah O’Donnellon, Mrs Hosty, and Pateen Green. There was an entry through a large archway into a courtyard known as Green’s Alley and the five houses there were occupied by the Andersons, McDonaghs, Canavans, Gorhams, and Finnertys. A Mrs McDonagh lived next door in a building known as The Hall and further on lived Mrs Lee, John Folan, Bideen Joyce, Ella McDonagh, Mrs Folan, and Mike Walsh.

Galway roads to benefit from €32 million in Government funding

A total of €31.7 million has been allocated to the Galway city and county councils for repairs, maintenance, and improvements to the city and county road network.

For one hour every year, the Streets are yours — Get running

The Streets of Galway 8K, sponsored by the Galway Clinic is almost upon us and is now one of the biggest events in the city.

Why Wolfe Tone and the 1798 Rebellion still matter

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If you happen to cross Galway’s Wolfe Tone Bridge, spare a thought for the man whose name it carries, especially as this month - yesterday, June 20, to be precise - marks the 255th anniversary of Tone’s birth.

Get the Galway Safe App on your phone and enjoy Galway safely

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In a city where vibrancy and energy are at the centre of your average night out, a need has arisen to make the experience a safer one; one that takes cognisance of the many aspects of socialising and the psychological consequences of this.

The spirits come alive at Macnas' Halloween parade on Sunday

This Sunday will see Galway's city streets erupt in a riot of colour, magic, spectacle, mischief, and wild imagination as Port na bPúcaí, the Macnas Halloween parade, winds it way through town.

Why teaching offers precarious employment, not a secure job

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Last week, in the rare autumnal sunshine, Insider was sauntering across Wolfe Tone Bridge with a companion. On a lamppost we spied a Donny Osmond lookalike, with that synthetic cheesy smile, peering down from a Social Democrat poster.

Club GASS - two shows for Pride

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CLUB GASS, Galway's only LGBT+ club night, will run for two nights as part of the 2017 Galway Community Pride festival, taking place in the Róisín Dubh this Friday and Saturday night.

The Fishmarket

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It is a pity really that we cannot see this photograph in colour because what we are looking at must have been a wonderful colourful animated scene full of black shawls, patterned and coloured shawls, blue cloaks and red cloaks, white aprons, práiscíns, baskets, scibs, barrels, fisherwomen from The Claddagh, and customers from the town. Imagine the noisy competition between the sellers, the lively female eloquence, the haggling, “Fresh fish, Johnny Dory, lovely mackerel,” etc. It all sounds like great fun and very romantic, but of course it was vital for the Claddagh women who were trying to make a living, to make enough to support their families.

 

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