Search Results for 'United States Navy'

9 results found.

American ambassador to mark Clifden wartime generosity to stricken airmen

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On September 14, 1944 a United States Navy PB4Y-1 Liberator Bomber crashed into the Atlantic Ocean close to Ballyconneely in Connemara.

US Ambassador remembers act of kindness in September 1944

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Shortly after dawn on Saturday, September 16 1944, Michael Conneely, a bachelor of 55 years, was asleep in his cottage at Ailleabreach, Ballyconneely, when loud banging on his door woke him. He shouted ‘who’s there?’ The storm of the previous two days had abated but he couldn’t make out what the voice said. Grabbing a pitchfork, he slowly opened to door. Outside were two men, wet to the skin, in deep distress. Michael put the pitchfork to the throat of the first man: “Who are you?”

Alcock and Brown showed the way...

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Week V

Charles Lindberg lands in Paris - heralds new era of air travel

Week IV

‘A new breed of pilot emerged’

In April 1913, the Daily Mail offered £10,000 (about €500,000 today)

Discovering Hedy Lamarr, movie star and inventor

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HEDY LAMAAR, once described as "the most beautiful woman in the world" was one of the screen goddesses of Hollywood’s golden age from the 1930s to the 1950s, but when not portraying mythic temptresses like Helen of Troy or Delilah, Lamarr was also a gifted scientific inventor.

US destroyer to be named after Ballyhaunis man

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The US navy is to name a destroyer after Ballyhaunis native Patrick Gallagher. The USS Gallagher, as it will be called, will be built in Maine.

HEDY! The Life & Inventions of Hedy Lamarr

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HEDY LAMARR was a Hollywood film star between the 1930s and 1950s, and an icon of beauty and glamour, but her greatest achievement is all around us, as her work as a scientist and inventor laid the grounds for much of our digital and internet technology.

Racing the Union’s blockade of Confederate ports

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The American Civil War (1861-1865) offered rich pickings to qualified seamen and shipowners looking for quick profits. The Union blockade of southern ports was beginning to have an effect on Confederate trade. But any ship which steamed safely through the blockade could command high prices for its cargo. On the homeward journey, if you were lucky, large profits could be made on a cargo of cotton which was in big demand in Britain.

 

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