Search Results for 'Tom Browne'

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Menlo oarsmen

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One of the great sporting achievements of the last century was the remarkable success of a group of Irish speaking farmers and local men from Menlo. During a very wet spring when they could do little work on their farms or on the bog, as they watched rowing crews going up and down the river, a group of them decided to form a rowing club. They asked to become members of Menlo Emmetts Hurling Club and adopted the name. Many of them would have spent a lot of time on the river, but that did not mean they knew how to handle a racing boat. When they took their clinker out for the first time, it took them a good while to steady the boat. A local man watching, described them as “The Wobblers” and this name stuck for a few years.

Kilkerrin/Clonberne aim for six in a row on Saturday

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The county senior ladies' football final between Kilkerrin-Clonberne and Corofin outfit takes place in Moyullen on Saturday (3pm).

Big scores around the clubs last weekend

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The good summer weather brought large numbers out to the golf clubs around the county last weekend.

Environmental Researchers’ Colloquium at Athlone IT

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The Irish Environmental Researchers' Colloquium (ENVIRON) is the largest annual gathering of environmental researchers in Ireland, regularly attracting in the region of 300 delegates.

Galway club hurling, 1884 to 1934

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An intriguing report appeared in the Galway Express of March 21 1903 which stated: “At Prospect Hill on St Patrick’s Day, two hurling matches were played between the Gaelic League v Queen’s College, and Castlegar v Bohermore. The National Independence Band, The Forster Street Fife and Drum Band and the Industrial School Band, with several thousand people, attended. In the match between the Gaelic League and Queen’s College, the League won by 3 – 3 to 2 – 0. Castlegar beat Bohermore.”

St Patrick’s Brass Band

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One of Galway’s most enduring, most enjoyable, and most enjoyed institutions is the community based musical group, St Patrick’s Brass Band. The band was founded in Forster Street in 1896 and they have been entertaining Galwegians since.

Connacht Rugby

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The first team to represent Connacht in rugby played against Leinster on December 8 1885. At that time, the game in the west was played by just a few schools. In the city, it was really only UCG and the Grammar School who played with any regularity. By the beginning of the last century the Jes, the Bish, and St Mary’s were competing. The growth of the game was interrupted by World War I and by the War of Independence, but it improved a lot after the truce.

 

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