Search Results for 'Tim Robinson'

14 results found.

Mam Eán - A name that ‘speaks of the world’s wonders’

image preview

That great observer of landscape Tim Robinson reminds us that Connemara is full of saints. Perhaps there isn't a saint in the place today, but they were certainly there in profusion in earlier times. Looking around him from the heights of Errislannan, near Clifden, Tim observes that practically every one of the headlands and islands that he sees has its saint. There is St Roc at Little Killary, St Colmán on Inishboffin, St Ceannanach at Cleggan, St Féichín in Omey and High Island, and all the saints in the tangled archipelagos east of Carna, Bearchan, Breacán, and Enda; and the obscure Mocán or Smocán of Barr an Doire near An Cheathrú Rua, 'and finally the great St Colm Cille who has all the south Connemara coast under his protection...'

Lady Rachel Dudley- a superwoman of her time

image preview

There is a sad little story told by one of the so called Lady Dudley Nurses in Carna shortly after the nursing scheme had been introduced in 1903. A nurse had been attending a sick child for some time. The child had suffered, but was getting better. One day the nurse brought her a doll, with a smiley face, and nice clothes. The girl had never seen a doll before. She held it in awe and with gentleness. But the next time the nurse visited the house the child was in despair. “Oh nurse,” she cried, “the little one hasn’t eaten a thing since you were here and I am afraid she will die, and I’ll be sick again wanting her back”...

The stranger waiting at Maam Cross station

image preview

There was a humorous mix-up when Pádraig Pearse first visited Ros Muc in 1903. He was 24 years of age, and already imbued by a passion, and a vision for the Ireland of the new century.

White Star chairman J Bruce Ismay finds peace in the west

image preview

On that terrible cold night of April 14 1912, in the North Atlantic, the Titanic was sinking head first into a freezing, calm sea. It had struck an iceberg 400 miles south of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. And was fatally wounded. The incessant bip bip bip SOS call for help from the wireless telegraphist Jack Phillips and his assistant Harold Bride was interspersed with more dramatic calls for help: “We are putting passengers off in small boats. Women and children in boats, cannot last much longer”.

Dick Martin’s reputation as a duellist struck terror into his creditor

image preview

Last February some readers enjoyed the tales of George Robert Fitzgerald, of Turlough, Co Mayo, known as Fighting Fitzgerald. He was an appalling man who provoked duels by his insulting behaviour, with his cronies conducted a reign of terror through Mayo, and at one time chained his father in a cave to get him to change his will. He ended on the gallows at Castlebar.

A tribal book hamper for Christmas

THE NUMBER of books produced by Galway publishers or written by Galway authors over the last number of months has been as prolific as it has been varied and allows the Galway reading public the ideal opportunity to support local presses and writers, thus celebrating the scribes of their native city.

Chronicler Tim Robinson to be honoured with series of events in city and Connemara

image preview

Tim Robinson, the internationally acclaimed writer, map-maker and thinker, based in Roundstone, will this month launch his new book and be celebrated with a series of events in NUI, Galway.

The place where St Patrick wrestled with a bull...

image preview

That great observer of landscape Tim Robinson reminds us that Connemara is full of saints. Perhaps there isn’t a saint in the place today, but they were certainly there in profusion in earlier times. Looking around him from the heights of Errislannan, near Clifden, Tim observes that practically every one of the headlands and islands that he sees has its saint. There is St Roc at Little Killary, St Colmán on Inishboffin, St Ceannanach at Cleggan, St Féichín in Omey and High Island, and all the saints in the tangled archipelagos east of Carna, Bearchan, Breacán, and Enda; and the obscure Mocán or Smocán of Barr an Doire near An Cheathrú Rua, ‘and finally the great St Colm Cille who has all the south Connemara coast under his protection...’ But no St Patrick. I can only surmise that Connemara has so much beauty, so many stories of its people and places, its own music, magic and legends, that even the sandalled steps, and gentle words of the great Irish saint would have come and gone unnoticed.

At last a chance to storm the castle

image preview

For years commuters on the N17 wondered if it would ever be ready, but this weekend, Claregalway Castle which has been lovingly restored will throw its gates open and invite all of us to attend what will be the first ever Galway Garden Festival.

First Galway Garden Festival to take place next month

The first Galway Garden Festival, which will take place on Saturday July 10 and Sunday July 11, promises to be a very special weekend.

  • 1 (current)
  • 2
 

Page generated in 0.0454 seconds.