Search Results for 'The Freeman'

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The pro-cathedral, a brief history

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“On Monday last (July 1st, 1816), Galway witnessed a scene unparalleled in her history, or in the history of the British Empire. It was an unusual but gratifying sight to behold Protestants and Catholics, the Civil and Ecclesiastical Corporations, the Secular and Regular Clergy, all clothed in their robes of office, preceded by their various insignias, and marching in solemn procession through the principal streets of the town – not for the purpose of reminding Catholic of the galling degradation under which he labours – not to keep alive those feuds which have so long distracted our wretched country – not to display with ascendancy, pride and intolerant bigotry, those shameful destructions which have hitherto been a barrier to the repose and happiness of Ireland – no – but to lay the foundation stone of an edifice, which being dedicated to the supreme worship of the deity, will at the same time be a monument to succeeding generations of the unanimity, concord and harmony which exists between those of every religious persuasion in this loyal and extensive county.

The heartless evictions from the Gerrard estate, 1846

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Friday March 13 1846 turned out to be a very unlucky day for the 447 tenants on the Gerrard estate in the townland of Ballinlass, near Mount Bellew Co Galway. Shortly after dawn the sheriff, accompanied by a large force of the 49th Regiment under the command of Captain Browne, and an equally large detachment of police, arrived at ‘the place marked out for destruction.’ Despite the vehement protestations of the people, and their insistence that they had their rent money ready for payment, and that their repeated efforts to pay their rent was refused, the soldiers and police began systematically to demolish their homes, 67 in number. *

Club action back to the fore this weekend

The members of the Mayo senior football team will be putting last Sunday's disappointment to one side this weekend as the second round of games in the Breaffy House Senior Football League throws in across all the divisions. In the top division the local derby meeting between Breaffy and Ballintubber is one of the stand out fixtures. Breaffy, under new manager Declan Reilly, picked up a hard fought win over their other local rivals Castlebar Mitchels in round one, thanks to big performances from Aidan and Seamus O’Shea along with Alan Durcan in their full forward line, and will be hoping to have the same result against the 2010 and 2011 county champions. Ballintubber also picked up the points in their opening league game, seeing off Ballinrobe by six points, and Peter Ford’s men will be relishing this challenge that awaits them in Breaffy on Sunday.

What more could a landlord do?

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Despite some honourable exceptions the conduct of most Galway landowners to their tenants during the latter part of the 19th century was a disgrace. It led to disastrous social consequences. Although ultimately, the landed class were removed from their houses and lands, as a result of the Land War and acts of parliament; in many cases the peasantry too was decimated, demoralised and scattered to the winds.

What more could a landlord do?

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Despite some honourable exceptions the conduct of most Galway landowners to their tenants during the latter part of the 19th century was a disgrace. It led to disastrous social consequences. Although ultimately, the landed class were removed from their houses and lands, as a result of the Land War and acts of parliament; in many cases the peasantry too was decimated, demoralised and scattered to the winds.

Remembering Myles Joyce

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In April 1980, I interviewed Mrs Sarah Lynskey from Bridge Street, on her 100th birthday, for this column. In the course of our conversation, she told me her earliest memory was of “kneeling on the Salmon Weir Bridge with my mother and a lot of Claddagh women praying. I know they were Claddagh women because I can still see the triangles of shawl as they knelt on the bridge. We were praying for a fellow, they were going to hang him the next day. Joyce was his name”. She was talking about Myles Joyce, an innocent man who was to be hanged along with two others for the Maamtrasna murders.

‘A more exhilarating or magnificent scene could not be witnessed’

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On Friday evening, September 15 1843, Daniel O’Connell, with a small group of close friends, including his son Daniel and Dr John Grey, proprietor of the Freeman’s Journal, arrived in Galway. The excitement was intense. O’Connell, at 68 years of age, was at the height of his powers. Fourteen years previously he had succeeded in removing the oaths that had prevented Catholics from becoming members of parliament. He took his seat as MP for Clare, the first Irish Catholic to do so. His charismatic personality, brilliant oratory, and powerful intellect, had won him an enormous following, not only throughout Ireland but in Europe as well. His achievement earned him the title of The Liberator, which had all the resonance of an ancient and powerful king who had raised the sword of freedom.

The prisoner in the long, warm, overcoat

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Week II

Galway enjoyed an unusual breach of promise marriage case

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It is not often that one reads of a man taking an action for breach of promise of marriage. Such an action was heard in the County Court-house, Galway, at the Lent Assizes of 1817. (I think it was one of the first cases heard after the opening of the building).

No rest for the Freeman

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Time waits for no man, and Galway’s newest freeman of the city, John Killeen, is already setting new goals and pushing more boundaries.

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