Search Results for 'St Paul'

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Was James Hack Tuke the Oskar Shindler of his day?

A surprising rescuer of the Tuke assisted emigration scheme from the west of Ireland came from the London government. After the first group of 1,315 people had sailed from Galway for America on April 28 1882, the Tukes’ emigration fund was practically exhausted. Yet the demand for places grew each day. Now more than 6,000 applications, mainly from the Clifden area, but also from Belmullet, Newport and Oughterard, poured into the Clifden union where James Hack Tuke had his office. While poverty and famine remained endemic in the west of Ireland, people with spirit must have felt that the day-to-day grind was never ending. The threat of another Great Famine was very real. They wanted a new life.

James Hack Tuke and his plan to assist emigration from west of Ireland

The agricultural crisis of 1879, and growing civic unrest, prompted the Society of Friends in England to send James Hack Tuke to the west to inquire into conditions and to distribute relief. Tuke, the son of a well-to-do tea and coffee merchant family in York, England, published his observations in Irish Distress and its Remedies: A visit to Donegal and Connaught in the spring of 1880. In clear-cut language he highlighted the widespread distress and destitution at a time when the British government questioned the extent of the crisis.

Irish-American hoe-down @ Monroe’s Live

ST PATRICK’S Eve and St Patrick’s Day will be celebrated musically at Monroe’s Live with two gigs from Minnesota’s The Hounds of Finn.

Readings and book launches

Galway writers Maureen Gallagher and Alan McMonagle will read at An Spidéal Library this evening at 7.30pm. Maureen will read from her first collection of poetry Calling The Tune, while Alan will read from his new collection of short stories Liar, Liar. Both writers are published by WordsontheStreet.

 

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