Search Results for 'St Angelas College'

5 results found.

World has changed a lot since I became bishop, says Kirby in welcome to successor

image preview

At the time of my appointment as bishop in April 1988, Ronald Reagan was President of the U.S.A. Mikael Gorbachev was in charge of the U.S.S.R. and the Berlin Wall looked impregnable. As all these have changed, it is inevitable that there is a change in Clonfert as well! After a little over 31 years since my appointment as Bishop of Clonfert, I am happy that Pope Francis has today accepted my resignation. The good news is that, despite the prognostications of some, the diocese will continue to have its own identity and its own bishop. Moladh go deo le Dia.

So who is the new Bishop of Clonfert?

image preview

On Tuesday morning, Pope Francis announced that Fr Michael Duignan would be the new Bishop of Clonfert, to succeed the long-serving incumbent Bishop John Kirby who has filled the role for more than three decades. But who is the new Bishop?

St Angela’s College open day

image preview

On the shores of Lough Gill and still only minutes from Sligo Town, St Angela’s College, Sligo, offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate/part-time degree programmes.

Further education at GTI — your pathway to future success

Whether you have received the offer you want or are having second thoughts about the course you chose, it is worth checking out the further education options available to you at Galway Technical Institute, the largest provider of full-time QQI Level 5 and 6 programmes in the west of Ireland. GTI will host a final open day on Tuesday September 11 from 10am to 4pm.

St Angela’s College, Sligo — disability equality studies programme

image preview

Imagine living in a world where a person might have an impairment but not be disabled. A world where impairments are seen as normal, because physical and social environments are accessible to everyone, where non-disabled people are not afraid of saying the wrong thing to a disabled person, because having an impairment, visible or hidden, is accepted as being part of life, not something strange that should arouse sympathy.

 

Page generated in 0.0417 seconds.