Search Results for 'Songs'

328 results found.

How to recover from a bad interview

Q: I did a bad interview – there’s no other way of saying it. I didn’t need to wait for the inevitable PFO letter to know that I had gone down in a ball of flames. I was so hopeful beforehand, but it just ran away for me, and it felt like I couldn’t stop digging. How can I make sure this doesn’t happen again? (DG, email).

Irish Chamber Orchestra returns to Midlands in December for celebration of Christmas cheer

image preview

After wowing audiences during Birr Festival of Music earlier this year, the Irish Chamber Orchestra will return to Birr for a very special Christmas concert in December.

Distraught husband said doctor was drunk

image preview

On October 2 1876 Patrick Barrett of Ballynahalia, wrote a long letter to Dr T Brodie, the Local Government Board inspector, bitterly complaining about Doctor James Connolly, who failed, ‘through drunkenness’, to promptly attend his heavily pregnant wife. Barrett demanded a sworn inquiry into the whole sorry business, causing a row that fiercely divided the community of Moycullen, where old loyalties silenced witnesses from giving evidence, leading to a stunning finale of bribery and corruption that would turn the one street county Galway village into a Ken Bruen landscape. Barrett, accompanied by his brother-in-law Tom Conneely, set out briskly to call Dr Connolly, the local dispensary doctor, as his wife, Anne, was dangerously ill in child labour. The doctor’s housekeeper told them the doctor was gone into Moycullen, and not expected home till around 10pm. The two men walked to Moycullen as fast as they could. Just as they passed John Turner’s public-house they saw the doctor standing by the wall. The doctor began to move off towards John Geraghty’s pub, when Barrett asked him to come to his home immediately as his wife was very ill. The doctor asked: ‘Have you a ticket? (at that time for a doctor to make a home-visit a ticket had to be got from Mr Griffin, the Relieving officer for the area), Barrett said ‘No’, but if the doctor came he would get a ticket later. The doctor then asked Barrett to give him one shilling for his fee, to which Barrett replied that he had no money. Doctor Connolly turned away saying: ‘Go to the devil, or to the poor-house’, followed by abusive and derogatory language too unseemly to be included in the report. The doctor walked away leaving Barrett ‘excited’, and at the point where he almost lost his temper; but instead, he thought he would have the law on him. ‘Do I have to go into Galway to get a doctor?’ he asks.

Distraught husband said doctor was drunk

image preview

On October 2 1876 Patrick Barrett of Ballynahalia, wrote a long letter to Dr T Brodie, the Local Government Board inspector, bitterly complaining about Doctor James Connolly, who failed, ‘through drunkenness’, to promptly attend his heavily pregnant wife. Barrett demanded a sworn inquiry into the whole sorry business, causing a row that fiercely divided the community of Moycullen, where old loyalties silenced witnesses from giving evidence, leading to a stunning finale of bribery and corruption that would turn the one street county Galway village into a Ken Bruen landscape. Barrett, accompanied by his brother-in-law Tom Conneely, set out briskly to call Dr Connolly, the local dispensary doctor, as his wife, Anne, was dangerously ill in child labour. The doctor’s housekeeper told them the doctor was gone into Moycullen, and not expected home till around 10pm. The two men walked to Moycullen as fast as they could. Just as they passed John Turner’s public-house they saw the doctor standing by the wall. The doctor began to move off towards John Geraghty’s pub, when Barrett asked him to come to his home immediately as his wife was very ill. The doctor asked: ‘Have you a ticket? (at that time for a doctor to make a home-visit a ticket had to be got from Mr Griffin, the Relieving officer for the area), Barrett said ‘No’, but if the doctor came he would get a ticket later. The doctor then asked Barrett to give him one shilling for his fee, to which Barrett replied that he had no money. Doctor Connolly turned away saying: ‘Go to the devil, or to the poor-house’, followed by abusive and derogatory language too unseemly to be included in the report. The doctor walked away leaving Barrett ‘excited’, and at the point where he almost lost his temper; but instead, he thought he would have the law on him. ‘Do I have to go into Galway to get a doctor?’ he asks.

Halloween weekend at An Taibhdhearc

Gáire as Gaeilge: A night of stand-up comedy as part of the Galway Comedy Festival, An Taibhdhearc will host a line-up of the best Irish speaking comedians who will deliver 90 minutes of jokes “as Gaeilge”. Potentially the most fun you can ever have in Irish... the craic will be 90!

Top tips to look on the bright side as clocks go back on October 30

image preview

Before children, you probably never gave daylight saving time a second thought but now you’re a parent, there’s nothing you hate more (well, except for maybe when your child stiffens their whole body when you’re trying to get them in their car seat!).

Experience live music like a chieftain at the Meet Me at Sundown festival in Claregalway Castle

The concerts which are taking place on three consecutive Tuesdays in October, with the same acts performing the day before in Orlagh Castle in Dublin, sees double headliner shows featuring plenty of talent from this island and beyond.

Love yourself, love your bed

Loving yourself requires a long-term commitment to the triumvirate of health — proper nutrition, regular exercise, and adequate sleep. When you really want to treat yourself, you may even invest in the occasional pampering or luxury experience to reward yourself and recharge.

Music for Galway’s 41st International Concert Season opens tonight

image preview

Music for Galway’s 41st International Concert Season opens with a new initiative, the Galway Encore; the opening concert, scheduled for tonight Thursday September 29 at 8.00 pm at the Emily Anderson Concert Hall in the University of Galway, will also see a repeat performance in Christ Church in Portumna tomorrow, September 30 at the same time.

Spunout innovates with new ‘BeReal With How You Feel’ campaign

image preview

Spunout, in partnership with Pluto The Agency, has launched their innovative BeReal With How You Feel campaign. spunout is the first ever organisation in Ireland to use the BeReal app as a communications tool, as they aim to showcase positive uses of social media for young people’s mental health.

 

Page generated in 0.0676 seconds.