Search Results for 'Somerville'

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Protecting Edward VII - A ‘friend of the Pope’, in Connemara 1903

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Pleased with his friendly reception in Dublin in 1903, His Majesty King Edward VII determined to visit the wilds of Connemara and Kerry. Such a visit presented a number of problems for Dublin Castle, not least was security at a time when nationalism was rearing its head, and seldom lost an opportunity to express itself by demostrations and protests. I learn something of these concerns from a delightful book Memories: Wise and Otherwise. by The Rt Hon Sir Henry Robinson, Bart, KCB. (Published by Cassell and Co, London, 1923). Robinson was head of the Local Government Board in Ireland, and a man, who in the tradition of Somerville and Ross, saw humour in the Irish character, and indeed in the efforts of Britain to maintain control in Ireland.

The winter tram

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This photograph of a single-deck horse drawn tram was taken in Eyre Square c1900. The American style dome roof top cover provided cover for passengers during the winter. In one of their books, Somerville and Ross described these vehicles thus: “The little one-horse trams glide along the shining desolate road like white-backed beetles.” This tram was painted in a battleship grey colour. The double-deck open summer trams, which needed two horses to pull them, were painted in olive-green and white.

Seamus Heaney’s ‘Postscript’

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In September 2004 Seamus Heaney opened the Autumn Gathering in Gort, and he read the above poem (which I will conclude in a moment), and told the audience that he was happy to be once again in south Galway. “ To drive across Ireland, east to west, towards Padraic Fallon’s native Galway, is to experience a double sensation of refreshment and déja-vu. The refreshment comes from the big lift of the sky beyond the River Shannon, the déja-vu from entering a landscape which has been familiar for a century as an image of the dream Ireland invented by the Irish Literary Revival.’

Sure we’re not right Michael sure we’re not!

The headlining act at the Percy French Summer School this July 13-15 will surely kick-start proceedings in an energetic fashion as it reflects the current political and economic crises. The talk, given by Tim Pat Coogan, journalist and editor, will prove a lively forum for discussion and debate and will receive an added colourful dimension as proceedings are chaired by Roscommon’s own Deputy Luke ‘Ming’ Flanagan.

The time that Máirtín Plásán was best man at the wedding

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“They’re coming. They’re coming, look! They’re coming at last,” said old John Larry. “ Look at them down in Leighleitir”... “ Who’s winning?” said Micilín Deaid, “It’s not our giorrán by any chance?” “No, I don’t think so,” said another. “There’s a black one in front with a white star”.... “ Come on Garrai Gamhain!” shouted one. “ Come on Leamhcoill!” roared another. “ Up Leitir Í! Said a few young lads. “ Come on Cnoc ar Eas Thoir!” answered others.

Geralds fail to make the grade

This could be the last time that these sides clash on a Wednesday afternoon when the budget cutbacks in education kick into life in January and for the first 30 minutes of the contest, it looked like it might be no bad thing. But once the second half threw in a completely different contest emerged as both sides went at each other once the silverware was up for grabs.

 

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