Search Results for 'Royal Irish Constabulary'

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Thomas ‘Baby’ Duggan

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Thomas Duggan was popularly known as “Baby” because of the contrast to his considerable proportions. He was born in 1899. Although only a boy, he was one of the first to take up arms with Liam Mellows in the lead up to the Rising. When the Rising was quelled, he was arrested with many others and interned at Frongoch. He was kept there until Christmas, when he was released under a general amnesty.

Peg Broderick-Nicholson and the War Of Independence

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Peg was born at 17 Prospect Hill of parents with a strong nationalist outlook. She went to school in ‘The Pres’, where after the 1916 Rising there was a pitched battle between the wearers of the red, white, and blue badges (common during World War I) and those wearing green, white, and gold badges. The green side won, but then all the badges were confiscated by Mother Brendan.

The Auxiliaries in Galway

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As the guerrilla war attacks by the Irish Volunteers on the RIC began to escalate in 1919, the British government recruited World War I veterans as a complementary force to the RIC. It advertised for men willing “to face a tough and dangerous task”. These were the Black and Tans. A further campaign was launched to recruit former army officers who were specifically formed into counter insurgency units known as the Auxiliaries or ‘The Auxies’. They wore distinctive ‘Tam O’Shanter’ caps. One of these units, D Company, was stationed in Lenaboy Castle and in ‘The Retreat’ in Salthill.

Lots of events coming up at the National Museum

Next Friday, August 15, from 11am to 1pm the museum will host a Knitting: Not Just for Nanas drop in event. Start a new project or get help finishing an old one. Learn a new skill for life. Holiday makers and beginners welcome. No booking required. This event is suitable from seven years and up.

A thankless and a dangerous job

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Week II

Connemara becomes battlefield in Tan war

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Week III

Connemara becomes battlefield in Tan war

Week III

St Patrick's Day 1921 — murder and mayhem in Clifden

Just before 6am on St Patrick's Day 1921, Monsignor McAlpine, the Catholic parish priest of Clifden, Co Galway, was woken by loud banging on his door. “For God's sake, Canon, come down - the town is ablaze.”

‘A long and dangerous night in Galway’

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There was a fearful incident at Galway railway station on the evening September 8 1920. A larger crowd than usual waited for the Dublin train. The big story of the day was the Terrance McSweeney hunger strike in Brixton prison. The young Sinn Fein Lord Mayor of Cork was in his second month without food. The people of Ireland, and the Irish across the world, were totally focused on this drama. McSweeney died on October 25 after 74 days. The Dublin papers that evening would have had the latest health reports.

Coolbawn Ambush Commemoration

The annual Coolbawn Ambush Commemoration took place in Castlecomer on Saturday June 18, exactly 90 years since that fateful day. The event was organised by North Kilkenny Sinn Féin and drew a large, enthusiastic, crowd to the town despite the inclement weather.

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