Search Results for 'Prime Minister'

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‘An unbroken history of more than one hundred years’

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In 1831 Patrick Broderick, from Loughrea, was charged with insurrectionary crimes at the Galway Assizes, and cruelly sentenced to spend the rest of his life in a criminal colony ‘beyond the seas’ in New South Wales, Australia. He was barred from ever returning to his native land. His wife Mary, son John and daughters Ann and Catherine, were left destitute on the infamous Clanricarde estate, one with more than 2,000 tenants.

Surprise visit from Robbie Henshaw warms the soul as TG4 programmes continue to engross

Hello to all the Advertiser readers.

Trouble brewing in Europe

Hello to all the Advertiser readers.

Beware the dangerous paranoia about China and Russia

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Imagine if Iran, the Peoples’ Republic of China, and Russia suddenly announced a military pact to counter Boris Johnson which would involve the building of 12 nuclear submarines, with the contract for building said submarines being awarded to the smallest of the three, Iran.

A time when the Irish were not welcome

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Between the years 1845 and 1855 more than 2.1 million people emigrated from Ireland. They streamed into Liverpool, Manchester, Boston and New York. Many were diseased, hungry, dirty, broken spirited, with barely any personal belongings. Some embarked actually naked.

The extraordinary Fr Peter Daly walks on to the Galway Stage

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In the early decades of the 19th century fortunes were made in giving hundreds of thousands of emigrants safe passage to America. As the decades slipped by the numbers grew into millions. Liverpool had the main transatlantic business for these two islands, but Galway, situated some 300 miles closer to America, and with the onset of powerful steam-driven ships, believed that a better and quicker service could be provided.

A hero’s welcome in New York for first Galway Line ship

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The unfortunate collision of the Indian Empire into the well marked Margaretta Rock in the middle of Galway Bay was a blow to the newly established Galway Line. But by no means was it a knockout. Galway’s vaulting ambition to open a new ‘highway between the old and new worlds’ took on an even more determined energy. The exploitation of steam-power, driving ever bigger ships and faster trains, led to wild speculation as to what could be achieved even from Galway, in the middle of the 19th century.

The unity conversation is gaining momentum. So what’s next?

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Sinn Féin’s ultimate aim is to build an Ireland of equals. This will only be achieved by getting rid of Partition, reuniting our country, and achieving full national independence.

Unity conversation is gaining momentum. So what’s next, asks Sinn Fein MEP

Sinn Féin’s ultimate aim is to build an Ireland of Equals. This will only be achieved by getting rid of partition, reuniting our country and achieving full national independence.

Did a midsummer murder silence a guilty pilot?

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In June 1858 Galway town was in a fever of wild speculation and excitement. Its vision for a magnificent transatlantic port off Furbo, reaching deep into Galway Bay, where passengers from Britain, and throughout the island of Ireland, would be brought to their emigration ship in the comfort of a train, now faced being scuppered by the apparent criminal intent of the two local pilots.

 

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