Search Results for 'Porter'

37 results found.

'Nimmo’s Pier is one of life’s treasures; you can see so many different species of bird'

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Most people are content to get by with one trade or profession, but Tom Cuffe’s CV has a whole medley of colourful and intriguing jobs including photographing birds, devising his own pieces of modular origami, and exploring family history.

A prison drama in the Town hall

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November 1920 was the most vicious month in the War of Independence. Murder and mayhem were commonplace. The authorities reacted with vigorous severity. There were shootings and public beatings, buildings and homes burnt, and printing works wrecked. There was a sweeping roundup of the usual suspects, numbering in their thousands. The old gaol in Galway, and gaols throughout Ireland, were full to bursting point.

Friend tries to lift burden of history from Connacht

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Historical baggage can be incentive or curse, or as Connacht coach Andy Friend now believes, it should be ignored.

Why Wolfe Tone and the 1798 Rebellion still matter

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If you happen to cross Galway’s Wolfe Tone Bridge, spare a thought for the man whose name it carries, especially as this month - yesterday, June 20, to be precise - marks the 255th anniversary of Tone’s birth.

The Garda Barracks, Salthill

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The building which houses the Garda station in Salthill was originally called Forster Park and was constructed as a summer house by the Blake Forster family at the end of the 18th century. In 1850, it was bought by the Palmer family who were well known whiskey distillers, flour millers, and makers of porter. Most of their business was based in Nuns’ Island. Their coat of arms can still be seen on the facade of this building. We can presume that Palmer’s Rock (sometimes known as Saunder’s Rock), on the shore in front of this house, was named after a member of the family.

A high octane theatrical experience

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THE BLACK Box was packed to the seams on Tuesday evening for the premiere of Enda Walsh’s adaptation of Max Porter’s Grief is the Thing With Feathers, staged by Complicité and Wayward Productions in association with Landmark Productions and Galway International Arts Festival.

A glimpse back into an Ireland we deny knowing

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Sometimes we imagine we are further removed from depravity that we actually are.

A glimpse back into an Ireland we deny knowing

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Sometimes we imagine we are further removed from depravity that we actually are.

Time for tea at Christmas

It’s no secret that the Irish love their tea. The Irish drink more of this hot beverage per capita than any other country. The presence of tea making facilities is considered essential in any hotel room and is offered at breakfast, 'elevenses', lunch, dinner, and any time in between.

'The language leaps off the page'

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THERE WAS great excitement at the announcement that Enda Walsh and Cillian Murphy would be teaming up again to bring Max Porter’s remarkable book, Grief Is The Thing With Feathers to the stage, and that the production would premiere at the Black Box Theatre next March.

 

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