Search Results for 'Paul Duffy'

18 results found.

Ghosts of Galway’s past

image preview

One of the mysteries of Galway is that curious phrase under the west facing clock on the Galway Camera Shop on William  Street, which says: Dublin Time. The fact that now the clock shows ordinary winter time only adds to the mystery. But not so long ago Galwegians, delighting in the longer days of sunlight than in the east of the country, and displaying an oddity that makes living in Galway a pleasure, set their clocks a full eleven and an half minutes behind Dublin. However, trains had to run to a standardised timetable otherwise transport chaos would ensue. The timetable was set at Dublin time (linked, like the rest of the civilised world, to Greenwich Mean Time), so  as Galwegians hurried to the station they could glance at the clock, and probably have to put on speed (perhaps Galway Time explains why most meetings here are usually 11 minutes late?).

A postcard of Toft’s Amusements

image preview

The Toft family were associated with Eyre Square for many years since 1883 when they first brought a carnival there.

Old Galway’s hidden urban landscape

image preview

ONE OF the great pleasures of the early morning walk, jog, or run through the streets of Galway is that you can experience our urban landscape unencumbered with either human or motorised traffic.

Snapshots of Galway in another time

image preview

GALWAY CITY: Snapshots Through Time is a new book telling the history of the city through postcards of the area produced between 1890 and 1930.

The view from the distillery, c1885

image preview

Towards the end of last year, we featured a series of articles on the building that is now occupied by the students’ bar in NUIG. The building started as a jute bag factory, then was converted to a bonded warehouse for Persse’s Distillery, later became the National Shell factory during World War I, was occupied by the 17th Lancers and the 6th Dragoon Guards, before being converted into the ammunitions factory known as IMI.

The romance of steam

image preview

In late October 1890, Arthur J Balfour, nephew of the Conservative leader Lord Salisbury of the time, and recently appointed Chief Secretary of Ireland, went on a walking tour of the distressed districts along the Galway and Mayo coast. Accompanied only by his sister, and local officials who joined them as they passed through different districts, they travelled without police escort. Remembering that it was only eight years since the Phoenix Park Murders* it was a brave gesture. But Balfour was probably the best of them.** He was genuinely anxious to improve the conditions of the area. He had influence in London, and an imaginative grasp of his brief for Ireland. He met and talked with the local community leaders, listened to what they had to say; and sat by the open fires listening to the mná tí.

The 1956 All-Ireland final

image preview

Galway made it to the All-Ireland final in 1956 for the first time since 1942. They beat Mayo, Roscommon, Sligo, and Tyrone on the way and faced Cork in the final. The match was delayed for three weeks because of an outbreak of polio in Cork. It was played on October 7 in front of more than 70,000 people and it turned out to be one of the most exciting and thrilling finals in the history of the sport.

Galway County Show returns to former home

This year’s annual Galway County Show will return to the Galway Racecourse.

The Scot behind the Dublin to Galway railway line

William Bald, the man who proposed the Dublin-Galway railway line and created still unrivalled maps of Mayo, will be the subject of a public lecture.

A Galway Christmas book hamper

AT THE risk of milking a cliché to death, rumours of the demise of the book are greatly exaggerated if the amount of books published in Galway over the last 12 months is any indication.

  • 1 (current)
  • 2
 

Page generated in 0.0456 seconds.