Search Results for 'Martin Newell'

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Brave Valeo fight all the way

Valeo from Tuam came up just short in an epic All Ireland Junior football semi-final played in ideal conditions in Claregalway on Saturday.

Valeo cruise to Connacht final

Newly-crowned Galway junior champions Valeo are just 60 minutes from Connacht glory after an emphatic 1-15 to 0-1 victory over Erricson in the Connacht semi-final.

Savage leads the way as Valeo claim interfirms

Valeo from Tuam won their first county interfirms title when defeating reigning champions Electrical Concepts Oughterard by 2-17 to 1-7 in ideal conditions in Corofin.

Constitution Day, April 18, 1949

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On that day 65 years ago, the Government declared Ireland to be a Republic. This did not help Anglo-Irish relations at the time, and it also upset deValera and his Fianna Fáil colleagues, but it was the cause of public celebrations around the country.

Sparks Rugby Football Club

The Connacht Junior Cup was donated by a man called Senior. He was Alfred Senior, professor of chemistry in UCG from 1891 to 1918. The cup was first played for in 1905, and as Ralph O’Gorman says in his wonderful book entitled Rugby in Connacht, the event always had a unique culture, it was competitive and unpredictable, and had a wide geographical spread of participating clubs.

Galway mourns passing of a sporting character

A well-known Galway footballer of the fifties, Brendan Glynn, passed away in the city this week.

Up go those hands again for Galway

“Full back is Noel Tierney of sturdy proportions,

The blacksmith from Craughwell

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The participants in the Galway Rising of April 1916 anticipated their arrest and humiliation. During Easter Week, while the rebels were attacking police stations in parts of east Galway, and threatening an invasion of the town, the RIC was quick to round up all the usual suspects. They were easily recognised. Their public training, and their interruptions of recruitment meetings made them well known to the police. They were loaded into open-top vehicles and paraded ‘for the entertainment of the townsfolk’. Volunteer Frank Hardiman remembered being set upon and beaten by rowdies at a number of places, and pelted with mud by the town’s inhabitants.

Galway supporters at the 1966 final

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In 1966 Galway were fortunate to get out of Connacht by beating Mayo. To an extent they were also lucky in a hard fought semi-final against Cork. They eventually won what was regarded as the best game of football seen in years, by a score of 1-11 to 1-9. And so they were into their fourth All-Ireland final in a row and going for three wins in a row and the question was, would this team reverse the three losses in a row that Galway suffered at the hands of Kerry 1940, Kerry 1941, and Dublin in 1942? Meath still stood between them and Sam.

 

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