Search Results for 'Local Government'

269 results found.

Dillon urges council to liaise with landowners on zoning

Mayo TD Alan Dillon said he is raising 'the concerns of Mayo farmers and landowners in relation to the draft residential zoned land tax maps recently published by the local authority'.

Water sports enthusiast calls for national policy regarding zoning Galway’s beaches

cFollowing the controversial beach bye-laws that were under consideration by the Galway County Council to prohibit all water activities other than swimming in beaches across the country, water sports enthusiast, Barra Nevin is calling for a national policy on zoning beaches.

Right to build your own home in Rural Ireland to be protected – Burke

The Fine Gael Minister of State for Planning and Local Government, County Westmeath Deputy, Peter Burke, has announced that new rural housing guidelines will include the right to build your own home in remote areas and in rural Ireland if people have a work or family reason to do so.

Local Green Party representatives to host public event to address housing issue

The Longford Westmeath Green Party will host a special public event in the Radisson Blu Hotel Athlone on Friday, November 25.

New regulations will require electric vehicle recharging infrastructure at new homes

The Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Darragh O’Brien, has announced new building regulations that will require Electric Vehicle (EV) recharging infrastructure be installed in new homes to enable future installation of EV recharging points.

Distraught husband said doctor was drunk

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On October 2 1876 Patrick Barrett of Ballynahalia, wrote a long letter to Dr T Brodie, the Local Government Board inspector, bitterly complaining about Doctor James Connolly, who failed, ‘through drunkenness’, to promptly attend his heavily pregnant wife. Barrett demanded a sworn inquiry into the whole sorry business, causing a row that fiercely divided the community of Moycullen, where old loyalties silenced witnesses from giving evidence, leading to a stunning finale of bribery and corruption that would turn the one street county Galway village into a Ken Bruen landscape. Barrett, accompanied by his brother-in-law Tom Conneely, set out briskly to call Dr Connolly, the local dispensary doctor, as his wife, Anne, was dangerously ill in child labour. The doctor’s housekeeper told them the doctor was gone into Moycullen, and not expected home till around 10pm. The two men walked to Moycullen as fast as they could. Just as they passed John Turner’s public-house they saw the doctor standing by the wall. The doctor began to move off towards John Geraghty’s pub, when Barrett asked him to come to his home immediately as his wife was very ill. The doctor asked: ‘Have you a ticket? (at that time for a doctor to make a home-visit a ticket had to be got from Mr Griffin, the Relieving officer for the area), Barrett said ‘No’, but if the doctor came he would get a ticket later. The doctor then asked Barrett to give him one shilling for his fee, to which Barrett replied that he had no money. Doctor Connolly turned away saying: ‘Go to the devil, or to the poor-house’, followed by abusive and derogatory language too unseemly to be included in the report. The doctor walked away leaving Barrett ‘excited’, and at the point where he almost lost his temper; but instead, he thought he would have the law on him. ‘Do I have to go into Galway to get a doctor?’ he asks.

Number of homeless families in West continues upward spiral

Homelessness and housing charity Galway Simon Community has warned that it is highly concerned that the number of families and children homeless across the West of Ireland is continuing to spiral upwards. The charity attributes the continuing rise to multiple factors which are culminating into what can best be described as ‘a terrible perfect storm.’

Distraught husband said doctor was drunk

image preview

On October 2 1876 Patrick Barrett of Ballynahalia, wrote a long letter to Dr T Brodie, the Local Government Board inspector, bitterly complaining about Doctor James Connolly, who failed, ‘through drunkenness’, to promptly attend his heavily pregnant wife. Barrett demanded a sworn inquiry into the whole sorry business, causing a row that fiercely divided the community of Moycullen, where old loyalties silenced witnesses from giving evidence, leading to a stunning finale of bribery and corruption that would turn the one street county Galway village into a Ken Bruen landscape. Barrett, accompanied by his brother-in-law Tom Conneely, set out briskly to call Dr Connolly, the local dispensary doctor, as his wife, Anne, was dangerously ill in child labour. The doctor’s housekeeper told them the doctor was gone into Moycullen, and not expected home till around 10pm. The two men walked to Moycullen as fast as they could. Just as they passed John Turner’s public-house they saw the doctor standing by the wall. The doctor began to move off towards John Geraghty’s pub, when Barrett asked him to come to his home immediately as his wife was very ill. The doctor asked: ‘Have you a ticket? (at that time for a doctor to make a home-visit a ticket had to be got from Mr Griffin, the Relieving officer for the area), Barrett said ‘No’, but if the doctor came he would get a ticket later. The doctor then asked Barrett to give him one shilling for his fee, to which Barrett replied that he had no money. Doctor Connolly turned away saying: ‘Go to the devil, or to the poor-house’, followed by abusive and derogatory language too unseemly to be included in the report. The doctor walked away leaving Barrett ‘excited’, and at the point where he almost lost his temper; but instead, he thought he would have the law on him. ‘Do I have to go into Galway to get a doctor?’ he asks.

Galway among ten counties due to appoint biodiversity officers to bolster local action for nature

Galway will soon have a new Biodiversity Officer, with Galway County Council one of ten local authorities awarded funding to appoint a national roll-out of biodiversity officers to deliver and drive local action for biodiversity.

Respond has 184 new social and cost rental homes under construction in Galway

Respond, one of Ireland’s largest Approved Housing Bodies and service providers, have 184 new social and cost rental homes in construction in Galway. The organisation delivered 77 new social and affordable homes across the county last year.

 

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