Search Results for 'Lenaboy Castle'

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Our disused buildings can change our communities

One of the most important but underrated festivals that populates our calendar here in the west is Architecture at the Edge. When it first came about, one friend said to me “oh good, another chance to see into people’s houses, to see how the other half lives, to see how the other half builds.”

Architecture at the Edge theme inspired by debate over city art gallery plan

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Architecture at the Edge festival, which was conceived to help local citizens understand the many ways architecture impacts our lives, has launched its programme for this month’s event and its central theme stems from a debate held this summer about the re-use of key spaces within the city.

The Warwick Hotel

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Mrs Holmes was a relation of the O’Hara-Burkes who owned Lenaboy Castle and the Lenaboy Estate. She persuaded them to sell some of their land, ‘the lower pasturelands’ farthest away from the house, down near the gates of the estate to be precise. There, she built the house in our photograph, which became known as Greenmount. She ran it as a B&B but eventually it became too big for her and she converted some farm buildings in what we now know as Lenaboy Park and built herself a small house.

Luxurious family home in an unrivalled location

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Undoubtedly one of the most impressive executive family homes to come to the Galway market in recent times. This home combines luxury with an unrivalled central location, yet still in a private setting.

Cloran’s Cross

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In May, 1846, as part of a Famine relief project, 175 people were employed to build a road linking Dangan to Salthill. Part of that road was known as Bóthar na Mine (the Road of the Indian Meal) because all of the wages were used to buy oatmeal. I have never been able to find out how, when, or why this name was translated into English as Threadneedle Road.

Salthill Post Office

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IN 1851, a sub-post office opened in Salthill where the Bal pub is today. In 1859, Salthill was brought within the town postal area. In those early days the post was delivered on foot. The first bicycle postal delivery was in 1901. From 1914 to 1926, Michael O’Flaherty of Dominick Street and Mike Ruane of Henry Street had a horse and van which they used to deliver letter and parcel post to the Salthill area.

Salthill Post Office

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IN 1851, a sub-post office opened in Salthill where the Bal pub is today. In 1859, Salthill was brought within the town postal area. In those early days the post was delivered on foot. The first bicycle postal delivery was in 1901. From 1914 to 1926, Michael O’Flaherty of Dominick Street and Mike Ruane of Henry Street had a horse and van which they used to deliver letter and parcel post to the Salthill area.

City council to take control of Lenaboy Castle

The Galway City Council has voted to proceed with the acquisition of Lenaboy Castle in Salthill.

Grief and despair on Galway streets November 1920

Sunday November 21 1920, known as ‘Bloody Sunday’, marked one of the most significant events in the Irish War of Independence. The day began with an IRA operation, organised by Michael Collins, to assassinate the so called ‘Cairo Gang’ - a team of undercover British agents, working and living in Dublin. IRA members went to a number of addresses, and shot dead 14 people including nine army officers.

A Christmas card from Salthill, 1920

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As the War of Independence hotted up, the British authorities sent the Black and Tans and the Auxiliaries to Ireland to support the RIC. D Company of the Auxiliaries was stationed at Lenaboy Castle and at The Retreat in Rockbarton.

 

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