Search Results for 'Johnny Dooley'

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One hundred and thirty years of Connacht Rugby

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The Connacht branch of the Irish Rugby Football Union was formed on December 8, 1885 in Corless’ Burlington Dining Rooms, Andrew Street, and Church Lane, Dublin. The meeting took place after the first time Connacht played as a province in a match against Leinster. The clubs represented at the meeting were Ballinasloe, Castlebar, Galway Grammar School, Galway Town, Queen’s College Galway, and Ranelagh School, Athlone.

Heroes in green jerseys

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The extraordinary heroics and the wonderful result in the Sportsground on Friday last unleashed joy unconfined and gave all Connacht rugby supporters a great lift. As Eric Elwood rightly said, “The players and the crowd got their just reward,” so we thought to honour the occasion by showing you the Connacht team that travelled to Ravenhill on November 19, 1958, and beat Ulster.

Forty years of Highfield Park

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The area we know today as Highfield Park was originally a place of green fields and rocky granite outcrops and it was ‘out in the country’. There were very few people living there. Mostly situated in the townland of Rahoon (Rath Ún or Ún’s Fort), it was bordered by two of the main roads into Galway, the Taylor’s Hill road and the Rahoon road. There was a small granite quarry there, (near the grounds of St Helen’s) and a couple of stone turrets which probably served as watchtowers.

The race is on to end homelessness

The Midlands Simon Community is organising a relay race with a difference as part of its fundraising efforts for National Simon Week. The event, which is being hosted by Athlone Institute of Technology, will provide a unique way for people across the Midlands to show solidarity with some of the most vulnerable in our society and help end homelessness across the region, while having a great day out.

Homelessness highlighted in first ever Simon Week

The Midlands Simon Community yesterday launched their programme of activities in the first ever ‘Simon Week’, a nationwide initiative designed to increase awareness and understanding of the issue of homelessness. The week will also celebrate the vital contribution made by volunteers to the work of Midlands Simon Community.

The Glynn Cup, 50 years on

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Johnny Glynn was only 46 when he died on January 10 1959, midway through his term as president of the Irish Rugby Football Union. He was a director of Glynn’s famous fancy goods and toy shop on William Street (where you could buy tickets for rugby internationals). He was educated at the Bish, played rugby for Galwegians and Connacht (12 caps), became a well known referee, served in various offices including president of his club, and dedicated himself to the advancement of the game of rugby in Connacht. He was a modest man who preferred to work away in the background and demanded only that there be no departure from the spirit of the game, no lapse from the fundamental decency of rugby football.

Westmeath fall short in thrilling Christy Ring Cup final

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Carlow 3-22

 

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