Search Results for 'James Daly'

14 results found.

Pomp and circumstance, and one unmarked grave

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On June 12 1922 a very special ceremony took place at Windsor Castle, near London. Following the establishment of the Irish Free State the previous December, five Irish regiments, including the Connaught Rangers, the Royal Irish, the Leinsters, the Munsters, and the Dublin Fusiliers, which had served the British army with exceptional valour at times, were disbanded. It was a day of special significance for both the participants and onlookers.

‘ When I drop this handkerchief, fire and spare no man’

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Perhaps fearing that the refusal by Irish soldiers to carry out army duties in Wellington Barracks at Jullundur, northeast India, on June 27 1920; and that the mutiny would spread to an already sympathetic native population, leading to a general protest such as at Amritsar the previous year, the army authorities quickly took decisive action. The commanding officer, Lt Col Leeds, strode into the crowd of excited and rebellious soldiers, demanding to speak to its two leaders John Flannery and Joe Hawes. He warned the men that they could be shot for this; that such behaviour only excited the natives to rebellion. Hawes, smoking a cigarette, replied that he would rather be killed by an Indian bullet than by a British one (His disrespectful attitude to his commanding officer was noted).

Two boys from Loughrea

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At the beginning of the last century, two boys grew up together in Loughrea. Socially they were far apart, but they were great friends. John Oliver was from a particularly poor background. His family lived in a tiny lean-to shack out on the Galway road on the edge of the town. His friend was Tom Wall, who lived in a comfortable house on Patrick Street. John enjoyed visiting their home.  His friend played with a band, The Saharas, and there was often music and fun in their house, shared by his brother Ray, and their attractive sister Cissie.

Large number of Mayo boxers take part in cadet championships

Eight clubs in Mayo entered 17 boxers into the National Senior Cadet championships for 14-year-old and 15-year-old boxers. The competition was held in the National Stadium over three days last weekend. The IABA will be using these championships as part of their selection process for the European Junior Championships in Russia this summer.

Mayoralty House and Lower Cross Street

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This photograph of Cross Street was taken in 1946. Early maps of the city show an open air altar at the end of the street. It was built by the Dominicans and used for various processions and Corpus Christi. The building facing us is Mayoralty House which was originally built in 1793 for a member of the Daly family. This family exclusively held the office of mayor from 1776 to 1816. It was probably built by James Daly, who was mayor in 1804, 1810, 1814, 1818, and 1819. The Dalys owned the house until the late 1840s. In Griffith’s Valuation in 1855, there is no mention of Mayoralty House, but a house fitting its description belongs to the Town Commissioners. These had replaced the mayor and corporation about 1935. It was later used as a police barracks.

Young Pugilists take to scales

The younger pugilists in Connacht boxing will have the opportunity to qualify for the National Championships this weekend on Saturday, March 9 and Sunday, March 10 in Foxford Sports and Leisure Centre. Following a very successful Boy 4, Youth 1, Youth 2 Championships in the same venue and again hosted by the Knockmore Boxing Club the Boy 1, 2, 3 and under 18 Girls and Boys will take to the scales at 9am and the first boxers will step between the ropes at noon. A large entry is expected into these championships from the 47 clubs throughout the province and the finals will be held in Oughterard on Saturday March 16 commencing at 10 am.

The pursuit of love among Galway’s landed society

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Although rarely heard of today, ‘ breach of promise’ cases in the 19th century were quite common. A successful prosecution was a source of saving face, and social embarrassment; and could be of considerable monetary value if you were from the upper classes. All sorts of intimate details were revealed as the case dragged on, which provided delicious gossip for newspapers and their readers.*

Big weekend of action at St Anne’s and Castlebar tournaments

St Anne’s Boxing club held a very successful tournament in the Peter Callaghan Centre last Saturday night, January 12, winning 10 of the 16 contests on the bill. The female bout between Ellen McDonagh (St Anne’s) and Rosie Conway (Geesala) was awarded the best contest of the evening and Liam McStravick (St Anne’s) received the award for the best boxer of the night.

We can be proud of our military heritage

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On June 12 1922 a very special ceremony took place at Windsor Castle, near London. Following the establishment of the Irish Free State the previous December, five Irish regiments, including the Connaught Rangers, the Royal Irish, the Leinsters, the Munsters, and the Dublin Fusiliers, which had served the British army with exceptional valour at times, were disbanded. It was a day of special significance for both the participants and onlookers. It was reported in the London Times.

Minister should ‘butt out’ of Imperial purchase, says Labour’s Barrett

Labour councillor Harry Barrett has hit out strongly against the interventions of Mayo Fine Gael Minister of State Michael Ring in asking for a Departmental examination of the decision of Castlebar Town Council and Mayo County Council to buy the Imperial Hotel, in Castlebar.

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