Search Results for 'Irish Republican Brotherhood'

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Michael Collins remembered a debt for ‘measly £10’

An Taibhdhearc, Ireland’s only Irish language theatre, situated in Middle Street, the very heart of Galway, grew out of a conversation between two remarkable men, Professor Liam Ó Briain and Dr Séamus Ó Beirn.* Both men, passionate Irish speakers, believed that a lively Irish language theatre would promote Irish in an imaginative way.

‘Muishe, is it yourself that’s in it, Mr O’Brien?’

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Liam Ó Briain, professor of romance languages UCG, was arrested by the Black and Tans on November 21 1920. He was taken to the RIC barracks, at that time in Dominick Street, and then up to the army barracks at Earls island, where he was identified. Other men arrested stood in line. They were watched by ‘pompous young officers’ who, with ‘a hand on their guns’ ‘sniggered’ at the standing prisoners. They went up and down pulling hands out of their pockets. Ó Briain, in his recently published essays on his experiences,* did not sound too concerned. He was well known to the police authorities. Because of the murder and mayhem during the week of his arrest, he must have been expecting to be picked up.

Liam Mellows - Down and Out in New York

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Week II

Road renamed in honour of Elliot sisters

 

Mountbellew to host conference on The Fenians and Manchester Martyrs

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In September 1867, 50 Fenians attacked a prison van at Hyde Road, Manchester, intent on releasing their comrades Thomas Joseph Kelly, a Galwegian, and Timothy Deasy. An unarmed police sergeant, Charles Brett was shot dead and 26 men were tried for partaking in the attack.

‘The work itself is magnetic, it draws me in’

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MENTION GALWAY to Eddi Reader, and the Scottish singer is likely to go into a rhapsody about the city and county - and with good reason, it’s a place that appreciates her voice and music; it’s somewhere she has played often; and a region of deeply personal significance for her.

Plaque to honour 1916

A plaque to commemorate the local people who were involved in the 1916 Rising is to be erected in John Count McCormack Square.

Families and weddings Easter 1916

Joseph Plunkett and Grace Gifford were to have a joint wedding with his sister Geraldine Plunkett and her fiancé Tom Dillon, at the Rathmines church, Easter Sunday, April 24 1916. The confusion about the on/off Rising, the rumours about the possibility of Roger Casement being taken prisoner in Kerry, kept the couples guessing as to what would happen. But Joseph, one of the principle organisers of the Rising, probably knew more that what he said to his sister, that Grace ‘did not know the smallest thing about the political situation, and had no idea whatever of such things’.*

‘If we do nothing else we shall rid Ireland of three bad poets’

Poetry more than any other art form is intimately connected with the events of Easter 1916. Three of the executed signatories of the Proclamation, Padraic Pearse, Thomas MacDonagh (Tomás Mac Donnchadha) and Joseph Mary Plunkett were recognised poets of their day, who had used their poems to espouse the cause of revolutionary nationalism.

‘The face and voice of the coming revolution’

Week IV

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