Search Results for 'Gear'

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The Augustinian nunnery

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The Augustinian Friars have been in Galway since 1508 when Margaret Athy, whose husband was mayor at the time, built a friary at Forthill, near a spring called St Augustine’s Well, the waters whereof wrought miraculous cures. In O’Flaherty’s Iar-Chonnacht, there is reproduced a document in which a miraculous cure is attested to by the signatures of several witnesses.

Daniel O’Connell - A man not without flaws

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It is said that all political careers end in failure. The great Daniel O’Connell’s final slide into earthly oblivion was heralded by the now familiar sight of journalists descending on his estate at Derrynane, Co Kerry, the year before he died. They had scented a whiff of scandal, and like today, doorstepped him.

Footballers must bounce back to winning ways

The Galway footballers will have to get an early Mass this Sunday morning or have gone on Saturday evening as they face Cavan in Pearse Stadium at the unusual time of 12.45pm as part of an attractive double header with the hurlers who face Cork at 2.30pm.

Remembering Máire Stafford

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Máire and Seán Stafford were a touchstone of Irish language culture in this city for more than 60 years. They each had many and different talents and, when they were together, they made a formidable team. They were always together. It took him a whole three weeks after he met her to ask her to marry him. They kept Conradh na Gaeilge going for years, they kept Feis Ceoil an Iarthar going for years, they kept Féile Drámaíochta na Scoil going for years, they were the mainstay of An Taibhdhearc from 1950 for many years, their contribution to the quality of life in Galway was immense. They also reared a very talented family, many of whom were on the stage for the first time while still in their mother’s womb.

Eachtraí Seachtain na Gaeilge le Athlone Community Radio

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As part of Seachtain na Gaeilge, Athlone Community Radio 88.4 FM in association with Bhí Mé Anseo Publications and with support from Conradh na Gaeilge will host Rac agus Filíocht in the Aiden Heavey Public Library, Athlone.

Was James Hack Tuke the Oskar Shindler of his day?

A surprising rescuer of the Tuke assisted emigration scheme from the west of Ireland came from the London government. After the first group of 1,315 people had sailed from Galway for America on April 28 1882, the Tukes’ emigration fund was practically exhausted. Yet the demand for places grew each day. Now more than 6,000 applications, mainly from the Clifden area, but also from Belmullet, Newport and Oughterard, poured into the Clifden union where James Hack Tuke had his office. While poverty and famine remained endemic in the west of Ireland, people with spirit must have felt that the day-to-day grind was never ending. The threat of another Great Famine was very real. They wanted a new life.

RnaG celebrates the best of the west with a concert in Moycullen

RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta would like to invite the public to join it for a celebratory St Patrick’s Day concert which will take place on March 8 in The Forge, Moycullen, for broadcast on St Patrick’s Day, hosted by Seán Bán Breathnach.

Man seeking bail loses his rag and his liberty

A burglar caught red-handed in a bedroom was given a week in custody for contempt of court after he started shouting obsceneties a the judge.

NUIG Rugby face in-form Sligo in crunch league clash

NUI Galway Rugby are in the shake-up for another trophy to add to their burgeoining collection when they face Sligo RFC in a top-of-the-table Connacht Junor League clash.

Galway academic launches book on the 1916 Rising and its influence

A new book on the 1916 Rising, written by a lecturer in GMIT, details the influence of the event on modern Ireland.

 

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