Search Results for 'Galway poet'

22 results found.

‘Lady Betty’ and the ‘ enemy of romance’

image preview

In the 1820s the hangman for the Connacht circuit was a woman known as ‘Lady Betty’. She had actually been sentenced to death for killing her own son, and stealing his savings. But she escaped the hangman’s noose by pleading that she could fill the vacancy that existed for a hangman. Her first hanging was watched to see if she could handle the rough business of a public execution with some sort of expediency. Apparently she could. She was officially appointed to hang and flog those convicted in the Connacht courts.

‘Lady Betty’ and the ‘ enemy of romance’

image preview

In the 1820s the hangman for the Connacht circuit was a woman known as ‘Lady Betty’. She had actually been sentenced to death for killing her own son, and stealing his savings. But she escaped the hangman’s noose by pleading that she could fill the vacancy that existed for a hangman. Her first hanging was watched to see if she could handle the rough business of a public execution with some sort of expediency. Apparently she could. She was officially appointed to hang and flog those convicted in the Connacht courts.

Get ready to Testify! @ Róisín Dubh

TESTIFY!, THE new, free, night of poetry, music, and whatever else happens, takes place at the Róisín Dubh next Monday at 8pm.

Japanese/Irish poetry event at Charlie Byrne’s

JAPANESE POET Hisa Kagawa and Galway poet and playwright Rita Ann Higgins will be reading from their work at Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop tomorrow at 6pm.

The mystery of little Eliza Murphy of Island Eddy

image preview

Among the serious articles in the current edition of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society*, renowned for its hard facts and forensic research, is a surprising story as tender as its subject. It concerns two people, one a child of 17 months, the other a sculptor, who, up to now, have been unknown. Who are they?

‘The sharpness of the factory girl’s tongue’

In the late 1980s a number of innovative ideas were introduced to industry and business, that cleared the runway for the Celtic Tiger take off. The one that made great sense, and had an energy about it, was the inventory strategy known as just-in-time. A Japanese idea that spread through Europe like a Spanish forest fire in a heat wave. Instead of stockpiling raw products for manufacture or for sale (with all the attendant headaches of storage costs, temperature, accounting, etc, etc,) the management skill was to wait until stocks were low, and then pick up the phone and make sure your supplier gave you exactly what you needed at the right time, in the right place, and the exact amount just-in-time. Suddenly, everyone was doing it. Suppliers were kept on their toes, trucks delivered through the night, and a bit of excitement was injected into the work place.

Five female poets to read in a field

THE POETS Maighread Medbh, Mags Treanor, Susan Millar DuMars, Elaine Feeney and Mary Mullen will be reading in the open air this weekend.

Japanese and Irish poetry reading

MOST PEOPLE have heard of the Japanese form of poetry known as haiku, but tanka is a much older form, and Galway will get to experience it on Saturday.

North Beach Poetry Nights

image preview

GALWAY POET Pete Mullineaux will read at the next North Beach Poetry Nights in The Crane Bar, Sea Road, on Monday at 9pm.

Coole celebrates Tree Week, hurling and football greats, local heritage,

The biannual series of cultural events at Coole Park is now drawing to a close but there are still a few events to look forward to before the end of the programme.

 

Page generated in 0.0460 seconds.