Search Results for 'Cyril Mahony'

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Taibhdhearc Na Gaillimhe

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The history of theatre in Ireland goes back to the start of the 17th century. The beginning of the 20th century saw the emergence of plays written in Irish and that movement was given a significant boost with the opening of An Taibhdhearc on August 27, 1928. It is the oldest operational theatre in Galway and is Ireland’s National Irish Language Theatre. The title is made up of two Irish words, taibh meaning ‘spectacle or ghost’ and dearc meaning ‘behold’.

Heroes in green jerseys

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The extraordinary heroics and the wonderful result in the Sportsground on Friday last unleashed joy unconfined and gave all Connacht rugby supporters a great lift. As Eric Elwood rightly said, “The players and the crowd got their just reward,” so we thought to honour the occasion by showing you the Connacht team that travelled to Ravenhill on November 19, 1958, and beat Ulster.

The Ivy Hotel

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The Ivy Hotel in Eyre Street was known as Baker’s Hotel during the Black and Tan era. Captain Baker, who had served in the war, lived there with his daughters. A number of Black and Tans, including the infamous Krumm, lived there, and others frequented the hotel. The girls were friendly with the Tans and the local IRA took a poor view of this.

Taibhdhearc na Gaillimhe

On the 1820 map of Galway, the site of the Taibhdhearc was part of the then Augustinian Church. When the present church was built in the 1850s the site became derelict. The late Ned Joyce remembered a large tree growing on the site, a tree which stretched across the street to a tenement known as ‘The Windings’. The occupants used to hang their washing on the tree on fine days.

 

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