Search Results for 'Charles Lamb'

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Cré na Cille, now ready to read on a Kindle

Cré na Cille, Máirtín Ó Cadhain’s classic novel, has been adapted for radio, stage, screen, and now, in its latest incarnation, for the e-reader.

Public talk on Charles Lamb in Galway City Museum

The work of one of Ireland’s great impressionist artists, Charles Lamb, will be the focus of a talk in Galway City Museum this evening at 6pm.

Charles Lamb in Galway

image preview

Historic paintings of Galway are scarce enough so it is always good to come across them. Our image today is one of the Claddagh painted by Charles Lamb in the 1930s. It is hardly surprising that visitors, painters, poets, and novelists were attracted to this fishing village that was in Galway, but not of it. They were all fascinated by the odd assortment of thatched cottages, built at haphazard angles, with intersecting streets and lanes in which one could lose one’s way within a couple of acres. Sometimes they were built in irregular squares or circles around little greens where the young children played. The houses were very small, and while some showed signs of poverty, most were very clean and neat. The back doors of many of the houses looked into the front door of their neighbours, and though the buildings were quaint, picturesque, and romantic, modern sanitation was unknown there.

Charles Lamb in Galway

image preview

Historic paintings of Galway are scarce enough so it is always good to come across them. Our image today is one of the Claddagh painted by Charles Lamb in the 1930s. It is hardly surprising that visitors, painters, poets, and novelists were attracted to this fishing village that was in Galway, but not of it. They were all fascinated by the odd assortment of thatched cottages, built at haphazard angles, with intersecting streets and lanes in which one could lose one’s way within a couple of acres. Sometimes they were built in irregular squares or circles around little greens where the young children played. The houses were very small, and while some showed signs of poverty, most were very clean and neat. The back doors of many of the houses looked into the front door of their neighbours, and though the buildings were quaint, picturesque, and romantic, modern sanitation was unknown there.

City museum to get major makeover

The Galway City Museum will be getting a floor-by-floor makeover of all its exhibition spaces, in advance of a major loan of artefacts from the National Museum of Ireland.

Starting the twelve-month pilgrimage

There are historical reasons why we celebrate New Year on the first day of January. And when I say ‘we’, I am reminded that other cultures celebrate their New Year at different times, but, if for no other than commercial reasons, the Western way of marking the New Year on January 1 has been adopted around the world.

 

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