Search Results for 'Canal'

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The last boat to use the canal

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On March 8, 1848, work was started on the Eglinton Canal. The Harbour Commissioners had been anxious to develop the New Dock. There were about 300 boats in the Claddagh and the amount of seaweed landed for manure in the spring of 1845 was 5,000 boat loads, averaging three tons each. The seaweed factory had been moved up to ‘The Iodine’, so the work on the canal was vital. It would allow boats to go from the Claddagh Basin up to the lake, boats from Cong and Maam to get to the sea, and improve the mill-power on the Galway River.

World Canals Conference in Athlone a resounding success

Co hosted by the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland and Waterways Ireland with the support of Conference Partners, Athlone was the chosen destination for the 20th World Canals Conference.

Stunning townhouse on Canal Road

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O’Donnellan & Joyce is offering for sale a stunning two bedroom townhouse located in an exclusive development adjacent to the canal in Galway city. Canal Court is in one of the most spectacular locations the city has to offer.

The view from the distillery, c1885

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Towards the end of last year, we featured a series of articles on the building that is now occupied by the students’ bar in NUIG. The building started as a jute bag factory, then was converted to a bonded warehouse for Persse’s Distillery, later became the National Shell factory during World War I, was occupied by the 17th Lancers and the 6th Dragoon Guards, before being converted into the ammunitions factory known as IMI.

The Eglinton Canal

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In 1498, during the mayoralty of Andrew Lynch, an attempt was made to open a passage from the River Corrib along the Sandy River and through land to Lough Atalia, thus connecting the river to the sea.

 

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