Search Results for 'Burials at Glasnevin Cemetery'

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Maud Gonne - more than just Yeats' muse

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ENGLISHWOMAN, IRISH republican, suffragette, activist, actor, writer, and muse to WB Yeats, Maud Gonne was one of the most prominent figures in late 19th and early 20th century Ireland.

John Devoy's epic solo journey

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JOHN DEVOY, author of the acclaimed 'alternative' travel book, Quondam: Travels In A Once World, will be in Charlie Byrne's Bookshop to sign copies of the book on Friday November 8.

‘Shouting and cheering’ welcomes de Valera ‘home’.

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Week IV

De Valera comes ‘home’ to a rousing welcome

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Week III.

New Pope - new album

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DAVID BOLAND is one of the main figures in the indie-rock and alternative music scene in Galway city and a prime figures behind the Citóg nights in the Róisín Dubh. As a musician in his own right, he goes under the name of New Pope, and his new album is out now.

‘We have not forgotten about rural Ireland’ - Moran

 

Documentary on 1916 pacifist Frank Sheehy Skeffington

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FRANK SHEEHY Skeffington, the pacifist, feminist, and journalist, tragically and wrongly executed during the 1916 Rising, is the subject of a documentary to be shown on TG4 on Tuesday March 8 at 9.30pm.

Public lecture on the man who wrote our national anthem

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'Amhrán na bhFiann', the Irish national anthem, is by its very nature is one of the most performed songs in Ireland, and sometimes has controversy thrust upon it, becayuse of where it is, and is not, performed - but what of the man who wrote it?

‘What the hell is going on?’

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‘What the hell is going on?’ appears to be what the British Prime Minister Herbert H Asquith, is thinking as he disembarks at Dun Laoghaire on May 12 1916, almost three weeks after the Easter Rising. Following six days of intensive fighting, Dublin city centre was unrecogniseable. Practically all its main buildings were destroyed either by artillery fire or burnt out. The list of casualities was horrendous. One hundred and sixteen army dead, 368 wounded, and nine missing. Sixteen policemen died, and 29 wounded. And this at a time when Britain was fighting an appalling war in France, which seemed unending, and its mounting causalities were not only threatening his government’s survival, but had filled the British people with dread and alarm.

The Conradh na Gaeilge Oireachtas and Ard-Fheis held in the Town Hall 1913

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Conradh na Gaeilge, also known as the Gaelic League, was founded by Douglas Hyde and Eoin McNeill in July 1893. Their aim was to keep the Irish language alive and preserve the Gaelic elements of Ireland’s culture. It was open to all creeds, was non-political, and accepted women on an equal basis. It used a broad approach, organising classes and competitions in Irish music, dancing, literature, and games. After a sluggish six years in existence, it suddenly morphed into a mass movement.

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