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Al Porter - comedy sensation @ Róisín Dubh

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AL PORTER, the Dublin comedian declared "Ireland's ascendant king of camp" by the Irish Independent, returns to the Galway to play the Róisín Dubh this Sunday at 8.30pm as part of the Galway International Arts Festival.

Ten things to look out for in the club championship this weekend

1. Almost everyone in matching kit

May Sunday at Menlo

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Maytime was traditionally considered a time for festivals, and Galway was no exception to this. In fact it used to be said that the citizens had an almost reverential attachment to the old custom of going out to Menlo for three Sundays in May to partake in the pleasure of the open air and the early summer sun. It was known as ‘Maying in Menlo’.

Anything Goes for Galway Music Society

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Galway Musical Society celebrates its thirtieth anniversary in swinging style next week with a staging of the sublime Cole Porter musical, Anything Goes, at the Town Hall.

Cardiff will test Connacht’s mental resolve

Connacht need to change a poor record over Cardiff when they head to the Welsh capital for tomorrow evening’s Guinness Pro 12 fixture.

Thirty nine stories from south Galway

Before the cattle marts took over the selling of livestock and farm produce, that important aspect  of farming took place on fair days. The main street or the square of the town would become a heaving mass of people, animals, carts and stalls. The marts offered a point for disease control, and traceability that eventually became the norm. But before that, to pass through a town on a fair day was to witness  rural Ireland in full flow. Fairs were busy, messy, and lively occasions, and  very much looked forward to by both the shop keeping  and farming communities. There was a May Fair, an August Fair and another around December 8. Not only were animals bought and sold, but friends met, couples exchanged glances; clothes and boots were bought, and glasses of porter sealed a deal.

Ghosts of Galway’s past

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One of the mysteries of Galway is that curious phrase under the west facing clock on the Galway Camera Shop on William  Street, which says: Dublin Time. The fact that now the clock shows ordinary winter time only adds to the mystery. But not so long ago Galwegians, delighting in the longer days of sunlight than in the east of the country, and displaying an oddity that makes living in Galway a pleasure, set their clocks a full eleven and an half minutes behind Dublin. However, trains had to run to a standardised timetable otherwise transport chaos would ensue. The timetable was set at Dublin time (linked, like the rest of the civilised world, to Greenwich Mean Time), so  as Galwegians hurried to the station they could glance at the clock, and probably have to put on speed (perhaps Galway Time explains why most meetings here are usually 11 minutes late?).

Connacht’s Sportsground to become bastille for Bayonne

Connacht’s unbeaten home record this season is the priority when Pat Lam’s side returns to European rugby on Saturday (5pm).

Connacht’s Sportsground to become bastille for Bayonne

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Connacht’s unbeaten home record this season is the priority when Pat Lam’s side returns to European rugby on Saturday (5pm).

Henshaw and Ah You back to boost Connacht for top six Scarlets visit

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Connacht's internationals have been made available for Saturday's Pro 12 fixture against Scarlets at the Galway Sportsground.

 

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