Search Results for 'historian'

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The day Bishop Casey challenged America’s power

‘It was a scandal the way people waited in vain to see President Reagan and all they saw was a hand at the window,” lamented the late Cllr John F King at the first city council meeting following the visit of President and Mrs Reagan to Galway on June 2 1984.

Lucan and the Charge of the Light Brigade

It was the action that went down in military history as much for its commanders’ incompetence as for its soldiers’ perceived heroism.

Illuminating ‘Women’s Christmas’ with Herstory

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TOMORROW IS January 6 - the feast of the Epiphany - which in Ireland has long been known as Nollaig na mBan or Women’s Christmas in Ireland and was a day when women would get together and celebrate. That hallowed tradition is to get a whole new lease of life – and lights - this weekend with a new festival - Illuminate Herstory - taking place in towns and cities across the country.

The night Stephen Gwynn MP nearly lost his pants

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The outbreak of World War I brought to a head the divided camps among Irish nationalists, both of whom wanted Home Rule, or Independence, but both saw different ways to achieve it. Probably because of the large army presence in the town, and the natural benefits that the army brought to traders, as well as the family connections that had developed over the years between town and soldiers, the majority of people in Galway town favoured the British military approach.

Well-known Galway history professor honoured

NUI Galway's Professor Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh has received an honorary degree from the National University of Ireland for his contribution to Irish history, the Irish language and Irish public life.

‘What part of Galway is Ireland situated?’

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By the 16th century Galway was a compact, well laid out town with handsome buildings. The wealth of the Tribal families, built up over decades of canny and adventurous trade, was reflected in their luxurious homes; fragments of which, in delicate carved limestone, remain around the old town.

Be part of the Centenary Conversation

What have Paddy Cullivan (of Callans Kicks), Professor Roy Foster and Hector O hEochagáin in common? Not much you might say, but in fact all three will be taking part in The Centenary Conversations, Galway from Thursday to Saturday next week.

Racing the Union’s blockade of Confederate ports

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The American Civil War (1861-1865) offered rich pickings to qualified seamen and shipowners looking for quick profits. The Union blockade of southern ports was beginning to have an effect on Confederate trade. But any ship which steamed safely through the blockade could command high prices for its cargo. On the homeward journey, if you were lucky, large profits could be made on a cargo of cotton which was in big demand in Britain.

Galway fires

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The Connaught Buildings on Mainguard Street originally housed Connolly’s, one of the largest hardware and fancy goods shops in Galway. It had an impressive four storey facade on the front and five storeys on the Church Street side. In 1934 the ground floor was leased by four tenants. A fire started on the first floor, the flames spread rapidly, and smoke could be seen rolling from the building. Half clad figures fought their way bravely down the stairs which threatened to give away any minute. The damage was extensive and estimated at £1,000, but much of the sum was made up of the stock of the ground floor tenants which included a lock-up fruit and vegetable shop rented by Mr P Hennigan. A Mr McDonnell and his brother had a tailoring business on the first floor.

Concert to honour 1916 heroes at Clifden Arts Festival

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CHARLIE LENNON, one of Ireland's foremost fiddle players and trad musicians, will unveil his newly composed suite of music, in honour of the men and women of 1916, with a performance at this month's Clifden Arts Festival.

 

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