Search Results for 'Wolfe Tone Bridge'

22 results found.

Cycle a public bike and win your own bike on Thursday

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As part of the celebrations across European cities for “In Town Without My Car” (or “Car Free”) Day on Thursday, September 22 2016, Galway City Council will set up dedicated traffic-free space and a cycle hub in the city centre, and will run a City Cycle at 1.30pm.

The Fishmarket, 1908

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“The Younger Women with their cloaks draped around their heads looked piquant enough, their faces had not unfrequently the sweetest expression of passion, and their lips pouted charmingly. The old fisher-wives, on the other hand, who sat near the casks and smoked damp tobacco in short clay pipes, had something witchlike and menacing about them.” So wrote Julius Rodenberg in 1860. He obviously had a thing for beautiful young Galway women as he also wrote about them elsewhere. As for the older women, I would say they just glared at him because he did not buy any fish. Otherwise, what he wrote could be true of our 1908 photograph.

The turf market at the Claddagh

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This photograph of the turf market at the Claddagh, near Wolfe Tone Bridge, was taken by the journalist Lillian Bland in 1908. This market used to take place regularly as farmers, mostly from the Barna/Furbo area, sometimes even Spiddal, would bring their cartloads of beautifully stacked turf to town. They were hoping to barter or sell their produce and then do their shopping in town. They often carried loads of hay, sometimes loose, sometimes tied, and large cans of milk, also for sale. There was a weighbridge on the other side of the cottages in our photograph which was often used in these transactions.

Long Walk, after the rain, 1908

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The Spanish Arch was originally an extension of the city walls from Martin’s Tower to the banks of the river. It was built in 1584 as a measure to protect the city’s quays. It was known as Ceann an Bhalla or ‘The Head of the Wall’. In the 18th century, Long Walk was built by the Eyre family as an extension to the quays, and a breakwater to construct a mud berth. A number of arches were constructed to allow access from the town to the new quay but some of these were wrecked by a tsunami which occurred after the 1755 earthquake in Lisbon.

Search continues for missing man

Daily coastal searches are continuing this week for a man who was seen entering the River Corrib three weeks ago.

Take a Gourmet Taste Trail of Galway

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One of the highlights of this year's Galway Food Festival will be the taste trail of Galway, involving tours and excursions around the city and county, including explorations of the history of wild salmon fishery in Galway, visiting a range of different restaurants, and collecting seaweed along Silverstrand.

Wash day in The Claddagh

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“With its old houses — straw for their roofs and rock and mortar for their walls, and every little end of a wall whitewashed a hundred times in blue or white or thin pink — the Claddagh was lovely, and from a distance it did the eye good. It was quaint, of course, but also a home-like little village; it had sand for its walks and a turfy marlish stuff for its floors, and always curls of smoke from its square low chimneys.

Galway regains its ‘clean’ rating in latest IBAL litter survey

Galway has shown a noticeable improvement in tackling litter in the final Irish Business Against Litter survey of 2015, published this week. The city was found to be clean to European norms, and ranked joint 25th among 40 towns and cities surveyed.

Prime development opportunity and restaurant investment in Galway city centre

Mullery Auctioneers has been favoured with instructions to sell a prime city centre development opportunity and adjacent restaurant investment at Quay Street and Quay Lane, in what can only be described as a rare jewel in property terms, so infrequently do opportunities of acquiring properties in this location arise.

Macnas’s Shadow Lighter parade set to illuminate weekend

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The legendary Macnas Parade takes to the streets of Galway this Sunday at 5.30pm, to once again sprinkle its unique magic dust over the city streets. This year’s parade is entitled The Shadow Lighter and it celebrates the magical, mystical act of transformation.

 

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