Search Results for 'Victoria Hotel'

30 results found.

Galway and the Great War 1914-1918

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On August 4 1914, Lt Col Henry Jourdain, Commander of the Connaught Rangers in Renmore Barracks, Galway, received mobilisation orders which changed the lives of thousands of families throughout the city and county. Urgent appeals for recruits were sent out. Hundreds of young men began arriving from all over Connacht. Temporary military camps were set up outside the barracks to cater for the recruits.

Events to remember Armistice Day

Events are to be held locally this week to mark the centenary of Armistic Day.

Waterside, c1885

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Some 100 years before this photograph was taken, most of the area we are looking at would have been under water, the river covered much of what is Woodquay today. Most of the people who lived in the area would have been small farmers or fishermen, their houses (outside the city walls) made of blocks of stone, often with moss stuffed into the crevices and a roof covered partly with straw, partly with turf. The river provided a rich source of food, though in the city, the fishery, from the Salmon Weir to the sea, was privately owned.

Excellent city centre location

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No 60 St Brendan's Avenue is an excellently located mid-terrace townhouse, which has been completely refurbished in recent years. The property is a compact, yet spacious, one bedroom house, with living room, kitchen and bathroom at ground floor level and a large double bedroom at first floor level.

Exciting times ahead for Salthill Hotel

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“We are delighted with the vision that is planned for Salthill Hotel. The energy in our management team and staff is exciting and refreshing. It is a great honour to lead this hotel into exciting times ahead and be part of the wonderful story of this great Galway hotel.” - Nigel Canavan, general manager of Salthill Hotel.

It is never too late to invest with Colleran

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Colleran's auction takes place today (Thursday) at 3pm in the Victoria Hotel. If you are looking for a gilt edge investment there are two properties that will certainly interest you.

Stop! This is The Bal

This pub was one of Salthill’s landmarks for over a century. It was a post office originally until Joe Crehan from Ballinasloe bought it at the end of the 19th century and converted it into a pub, grocery, and guest house. The name Ballinasloe House was quickly shortened in Salthill to ‘The Bal’. At the time Salthill village ran from here to Seapoint with a few houses further west.

Part of Forster Street, 1905

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This photograph, taken from an old glass slide, shows some important personage in an escorted carriage leaving the Great Southern Hotel. There are some mounted liveried gentlemen in front and two RIC men on horseback behind the carriage, which is hidden by the RIC men. You can see a policeman on foot to the right of our picture.

The sinking of the Neptune

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This photograph was taken about 100 years ago and shows several boats from the Claddagh fleet moored at the quayside.

The crane at Woodquay

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In the early 19th century, most of the area we see in our photograph would have been under water. Woodquay was so called because of the 150 feet wooden quay that ran the length of it. It was a kind of second docks for the city, attracting a lot of commercial traffic down the river. The Corrib Drainage Scheme in 1852 began to change the face of the space we are looking at, and later, when Steamer’s Quay was built, the area was gradually filled in and reclaimed.

 

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