Search Results for 'Tom Kenny'

22 results found.

2017 off to a busy start in St Pat’s

Open day

Exhibition of an artist's year on Salthill prom

image preview

FOR THE past year, August 2015 to Aug 2016, I have been painting on the Prom in Salthill, in all types of weather, at all times of day and at night. My motivation was to capture images of the Prom not often represented in the various media, but at the same time real and in the moment.

The evils of mixed bathing

image preview

In 1925 there was a major debate in the Urban Council about a Garda report that two men from County Offaly who had been swimming in the sea in Salthill without any bathing costumes had been apprehended, and how the gardaí should deal with them. The debate was about the evils or otherwise of mixed bathing in Salthill.

‘No time for fainting’

image preview

‘The small girl smiles. One eyelid flickers. She whips a pistol from her knickers. She aims it at the creature’s head. And bang bang bang, she shoots him dead.’

The Easter Rising in Galway:

image preview

 

Galway in the weeks leading up to the Rising

image preview

On Tuesday 25 April 1916, Galway became the only county outside of Leinster to take up arms against the British state during the Easter Rising. In fact, only three parts of provincial Ireland participated in the Rising: Enniscorthy in county Wexford; Ashbourne in north county Dublin; and county Galway, where several hundred rebels took over 600 square miles of the east of the county between Tuesday 25 April and Saturday 29 April. Commemorative documentaries and history books pay little attention to the Galway Rising with the focus tending to be on the more dramatic events that took place in Dublin, but Galway’s Rising was an important part of the story of the Easter Rising; and the story of the hundreds of brave Galway men who stood up to the British Empire in April 1916 deserves to be told in detail. In this series of five articles, FERGUS CAMPBELL will explain why Galway rose when so many other parts of provincial Ireland did not, and he will also tell the story of what happened in Galway during the Rising, and the impact that the Rising had on Galway society. This account is based on many documents, police reports, newspaper accounts and memoirs but most of the quotations are derived from the witness statements that Galway rebels made to the Bureau of Military History during the 1940s and 1950s, and these can be read online.

Lecture in the Library to focus on Ceannt and Kenny

The final two lectures in the ‘Lectures in the Library’ series, curated by the Centre for Irish Studies to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising, will focus on the contribution of two Galwegians to the Irish revolution.

Election fever hits The Kenny Gallery

image preview

AS ELECTION placards leer at us from every lamp-post, and vote-wheedling leaflets are daily stuffed through our letterboxes, The Kenny Gallery’s new exhibition of Irish political posters, flyers, and assorted ephemera from down the years, could hardly be more topical.

‘The Galway Resolution’ - An attempted coup by some county councillors

On December 3 1920, at the height of the War of Independence, quite an extraordinary event happened in Galway County Council. It passed a resolution, known as ‘The Galway Resolution’, repudiating the authority of the newly established Dáil; it rescinded the resolution for the collection of rates, (which were collected locally, and passed on to Dáil Éireann, and not to the British authorities), and incredibly, Galway County Council now offered its offices to negotiate peace, directly with the British prime minister, David Lloyd George.

‘We are the ‘elder lemons’ when it comes to online book selling’

image preview

On Friday November 29 1940, a tiny new bookshop opened its doors for the first time on High Street in Galway city. Little could its proprietors, Des and Maureen Kenny, have then envisaged that this modest business start-up – embarked upon when Ireland was in the early stages of World War II rationing - would go on to be one of Ireland’s foremost bookshops and art galleries and, over its six decades, a valued friend to many of the country’s most eminent writers and artists.

 

Page generated in 0.0405 seconds.